472 Search Results for: springsteen

If these people are old, what does that make us?

How dare Debbie Harry and Bruce Springsteen get old?

I usually don’t get worked up about aging celebrities, mainly because I’ve managed to convince myself that their age is somehow unrelated to mine — this way, no matter how old they get in real life, in my brain they stay the same age they were when I discovered them. This helpful strategy keeps me from thinking about how when I first bought, say, a Bruce Springsteen album, he was a good 15 years younger than I am right now, which would throw off the entire space-time continuum. Of course as a Springsteen fan I’ve been particularly spoiled, since he somehow continues to power through his AARP years with the energy level (and waistline) of a 30-year-old, allowing us middle-aged huffer-puffers to fist-pump through his concerts as if we, too, have managed to curb the aging process. So what if we have to spend the next day with our feet up and a wet towel draped across our foreheads? For that moment we’re 19 again and all is well with the world, and also with …

Emblem3: Admit it, they're adorable.

What Bruce Springsteen could learn from Emblem3

My regular readers may recall my ongoing connection with the boy band Emblem3 — they’re the “X-Factor” finalists with whom I arranged a face-to-face interview with my then-14-year-old daughter, my single most significant fatherly moment since I rescued her from being run over by an oncoming sled when she was 4. I’m sure there were other things in between, but those two stand out. Regardless, this week I pledged to help Jackie get tickets to one of Emblem3’s “Fireside Story Sessions,” which are sort of like FDR’s fireside chats, except instead of FDR and a fireplace you get three young men with impeccable abdominal muscles or adorably tousled hair, or both, depending on which combination of them you’re talking about. And when I started to read about the sessions, it occurred to me that this is something every band in America should be doing, not just the ones with abs. Here’s how they frame it at Emblem3.com (natch): We’re inviting you to hang with us around the campfire for a super intimate, personal, and stripped …

Bruce Springsteen

Bruce Springsteen Faces Death On The Other Side Of The World

(or “What’s it all about, Stevie?”) “I’m just a prisoner…OF ROCK ‘N’ ROLL!” Bruce Springsteen’s been screaming that line for decades, and this time he’s screaming it in Cape Town, South Africa. These are his first shows ever in the country; rock ‘n’ roll has brought him here, just like it brought him to Australia and London and Prague and every city imaginable in the United States. Rock ‘n’ roll has been good to Springsteen. But he’s never been a passenger of rock ‘n’ roll, or a student. He’s always been a prisoner. And on this night, it doesn’t sound feel like he’s inspired by the possibilities. It sounds like he’s pushing up against the walls, working at the limits of his artistry, trapped and resigned. But still, y’know, having an awesome time. Springsteen has always been unique for the directness and clarity of his message across decades of work. There’s a clear arc from the desperate yearning for liberation on Born to Run, through the bleak wasteland of Darkness on the Edge of Town …

Bruce_Springsteen

Podcast: Bruce Springsteen’s “High Hopes”

A couple of weeks ago I reviewed Bruce Springsteen’s new album, High Hopes. It’s a bit of a departure from the way he usually works — unfinished tracks from the vault, no overarching theme, a few covers, etc. — and I wanted to see if I was alone in my overall opinion, which was “Yeah, this is OK, but it’s not blowing me away.” That’s not usually my reaction to a new Springsteen record.

Bruce_Springsteen

Album Review: Bruce Springsteen, “High Hopes”

When it was announced that Bruce Springsteen’s new album, High Hopes, was a collection of newly finished outtakes, covers, and studio versions of songs he’s been playing live, I was a bit confused. Even with his prolific output of late, it didn’t seem necessary to release something only two years after Wrecking Ball. Stranger, it seemed like a stopgap – the type of album Matt Springer and I concocted for our “Spare Parts” series a few years ago, hardly the work of someone who famously agonizes over every last detail of song selection and sequence.

Wrecking Ball

New Music: Bruce Springsteen, “We Take Care Of Our Own”

Out of the darkness of our SOPA blackout comes a ray of light. This morning, the long-awaited news of Bruce Springsteen’s new album was made official. Wrecking Ball, to be released on March 6, is Springsteen’s first album since 2009’s Working On A Dream, and features 11 songs. Wrecking Ball was produced by Ron Aniello, who has worked with, among others, Barenaked Ladies, Guster, and Mrs. Springsteen herself, Patti Scialfa. There is still no official word on the dates for a US tour. The album is said to reflect the same spirit that was found in last year’s Occupy Wall Street movement. According to Springsteen’s manager Jon Landau, “Bruce has dug down as deep as he can to come up with this vision of modern life. The lyrics tell a story you can’t hear anywhere else and the music is his most innovative in recent years. The writing is some of the best of his career and both veteran fans and those who are new to Bruce will find much to love on ‘Wrecking Ball.’” The lead track, …

Basement Songs: Bruce Springsteen, “The Rising”

I had a dream about Bruce Springsteen and he told me what to write. You’re thinking, “Again? Come on, Malchus, all you ever write about is Springsteen. And Journey. All you write about are Journey and Springsteen. Can’t you come up with any other artists?” Actually, the last time Bruce made an appearance in the basement was a year ago, as my family was in the midst of our annual CF Great Strides Fundraiser. Since then, the Boss has been hanging out on his ranch in Jersey. Carpet cleaning sent us out of the house on Saturday. Early that morning, Sophie, Jacob and I drove across town for breakfast at one of the local IHOP’s. Jake brought along his iPod and acted as DJ for our trek through Santa Clarita. After playing his current favorites, he asked what I wanted to hear. “Surprise me,” I replied, trying to focus on the road and dreaming of coffee. His iPod clicked while he searched for something. Meanwhile, I began thinking about what I should write about for …

Rock Court, Small Claims Division: Bruce Springsteen v. Tommy Tutone

All rise. The rules of this courtroom are simple. You will be presented with two songs, one by the plaintiff and one by the defendant. It is your task to decide if the defendant’s track is only coincidentally similar to the plaintiffs or, as members of the Bar Association put it, gosh darn it, I think they stole that feller’s tune rat’chere! You have been duly instructed. Today’s docket: Tommy Tutone, plaintiff vs. Bruce Springsteen, defendant Tommy Tutone – 867-5309/Jenny from Tommy Tutone 2 (1982) You know, I have only one song anyone really gives a crap about and it’s kept me in good stead for a while. Springsteen has how many tunes under his belt, yet he has to pilfer mine? Strike a blow to The Boss for the little guy!

Bruce Springsteen – Radio Nowhere from Magic (2008) It’s not that similar, you drama queen.

Bootleg City: Bruce Springsteen & the Max Weinberg 7 in Asbury Park, Christmas ’03

Six years ago I was fed up with the state of affairs in Bootleg City, but determined to do something about it. A small group of Bootleg City school board members — David Byrne, Bob Marley, and myself — were tired of being constantly undermined by Mayor Cass, who we felt had a personal agenda. Additionally, a young whippersnapper named Matthew Boles had recently joined the board, and he quickly aligned himself with the mayor in a not-so-subtle move to advance his political career, without any concern for who he might be stepping on as he made his way up the government ladder. (You might be shocked to hear this about Boles, but over the past six years I’ve come to learn that this is merely everyday behavior for him. It seems that you can never truly trust someone who’s a fan of the Little River Band.) On a quiet December afternoon, Byrne gave me a call to let me know that he had tickets to see a special Bruce Springsteen holiday concert in neighboring …

An Open Letter to Bruce Springsteen

Bruce Springsteen Concert Tickets Still Available At Less-Than-Retail Prices Dear Bruce, I’m writing to you as a longtime fan. I’ve been to about 60 shows, going back over 35 years. I can’t begin to tell you how important your music has been to me. As a proud son of New Jersey, I’m grateful for the respect you’ve brought to our state for your art, and for the way you’ve lived your life. For a number of those years, I’ve been bothered by the dramatic announcements by your advisers that the latest on-sale has sold out in “five seconds” or whatever, when the fact is that those shows are not sold out at all. There are thousands of tickets being held back. The effect of this, for the less savvy or inexperienced concertgoer, is to drive people into the arms of scalpers in the near term, because they’re afraid that if they don’t pay the exorbitant prices they’ll miss out. The fact is that if they would wait, they …

Live Music: Bruce Springsteen & the E Street Band, East Rutherford, N.J., 5/21/09

I admit it. I’m jaded. After seeing more than 50 Bruce Springsteen shows over the years, with and without the E Street Band, it’s gotten to the point where I just don’t look forward to the shows as much as I used to. The thing is, while I might not look forward to the shows with the same youthful eagerness, I always seem to leave the shows feeling re-energized, my ever more flagging faith in rock and roll renewed. That’s certainly what happened when I saw Springsteen and the band on the first night of their recent two night stand at the Izod Arena. While I’m sure the E Street Band plays great shows all over the world, and I’ve seen a few in other cities myself, there is nothing quite like seeing them at home in NJ. It’s like a bunch of dear old friends getting together for a few hours to party like we used to back in the day. We might not be that young …

Basement Songs: Bruce Springsteen & the E Street Band, Live at the L.A. Sports Arena, 4/15/09

I wasn’t supposed to be at this concert. A conscious decision was made not to spend money on a ticket to see Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band when they landed at the L.A. Sports Arena in support of Springsteen’s new album, Working on a Dream. No, I wasn’t supposed to be there, but Springsteen’s outstanding Super Bowl halftime extravaganza occurred the night before tickets went on sale. When that show concluded and I’d informed Sophie that I wouldn’t be in attendance at the April 15th show, she looked at me with pleading eyes and said, “But you have to go, Daddy, you just have to.” The next morning, after tickets were nearly sold out, Julie called me up to see if I’d purchased a seat. Upon informing her “no” she simply said, “Dude, you can’t miss Bruce.” It’s as if they both could see that maybe my soul needed some uplift and that maybe I would get that injection of life from the heart-pounding, soul-stopping E Street Band. While I still had Julie …

Basement Songs: Bruce Springsteen, “Working on a Dream”

Each spring when Great Strides rolls around and we begin fundraising for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Julie and I do our best to write a letter that grabs people’s attentions and hopefully inspires them to make a donation. This is actually a pretty tough task. We want to convey how devastating cystic fibrosis is, yet still rejoice in the fact that our son, Jacob, is doing well. We want to share that although Jacob’s health continues to be good, living with the disease has really taken a toll on him emotionally this year. And while we are incredibly fortunate that Jacob is doing well, lives are lost everyday. Despite the medical breakthroughs being made each day, children and adults fighting for their lives are losing their battle with cystic fibrosis. Last week, as we toured our daughter Sophie’s classroom for open house, hanging on the bulletin board was a paper she’d written in class about her greatest wishes. Included among her noble thoughts was this one: “I wish my brother didn’t have cystic fibrosis. He …

Listening Booth: Bruce Springsteen, “Working On a Dream”

Bona fides: I’m a Jersey boy, and a fan. I’ve got more than 50 Springsteen concerts under my belt. I’ve even met him once or twice, and no, I never call him The Boss. Now on with the show. Someone on Twitter (follow us @popdose) recently wrote that Bruce Springsteen’s Oscar snub by the Motion Picture Academy was his punishment for “Outlaw Pete.” Maybe. I do know that the failure of the Academy to include Springsteen’s title song from The Wrestler in the Best Song category is one of the most egregious oversights I’ve ever seen in my years of following the Oscars. Are the Academy voters allowed to write in their choices? I do understand the sentiment about “Outlaw Pete,” though. The song’s placement as the leadoff track on Working on a Dream (Columbia) is one of he most curious decisions in rock history. First of all, the thing is more than eight minutes long. Second, the story doesn’t make much sense. I suppose, based on his acknowledged respect for the iconic western films …