All posts filed under: Books

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We Get The Star Wars/Avengers Crossover Movie We Deserve

Let me say right off the bat that I love Stan Lee. If he hadn’t revolutionized superhero comics at Marvel back in the 1960s, I don’t know what I would have done with my free time from 1977 through 1981, which was primarily spent reading hundreds of comic books featuring characters he created. I would have had to go outside or something, and that probably wouldn’t have ended well. But Stan is 93 now, and while I’m thrilled he still seems healthy and active, let’s face it: The man will say anything that pops into his head, as people who’ve lived 93 years on this planet tend (and deserve) to do. Hence the interview resulting in the headline, on Epicstream.com: “Stan Lee Says Star Wars/Avengers Crossover Film Could Happen.” Now, Stan Lee hasn’t been central to the Marvel brain trust in decades, and certainly not since Disney bought the company in 2009, so this would be about as relevant in the real world as a story that says, “Stan Lee Says Zombie Apocalypse Could Happen,” or …

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2015: ANOTHER FINE YEAR!

So it’s the time of the season, when I get into that reflective mood and begin working my way backwards over the year’s music, books, movies, etc.  And 2015 was equally as rich as 2014 was, so I thought I’d share some of what I feel are the highest of nearly-innumerable high points over these last twelve months.  I acquired quite a lot of music – some purchased, some sent for review; I saw as many shows as my schedule would allow and read as much as my free time would give – which, of course, also means that my own new album is slower in coming along than I’d hoped (actually, it’s just stalled at the station for the time being), but it’s worth it.  And this year-end review is to help turn some of you on to these good/great/amazing things, in case you hadn’t heard about them previously.  So let us begin: TOP 3 ALBUMS FOR 2015:  these were the three albums that I listened to most often, after their respective releases.  There …

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BOOK REVIEW: Chrissie Hynde, “Reckless: My Life as a Pretender”

I’m a Pretenders fangirl, not an objective reviewer. Like Chrissie Hynde, I grew up in Northeast Ohio. I was in high school when “Brass in Pocket” came out, and when the DJ said that the lead singer grew up in Akron, quit her waitressing job, and bought a ticket to London to be in a band, I was blown away. She was proof that the world was full of possibility. No one had to stay where they were if they didn’t want to. Naturally, I preordered Reckless: My Life as a Pretender. I liked it, but there are good reasons why you might not. I write a lot of profiles and do a little ghostwriting, so I tend to read a lot of memoirs by musicians. It’s a good way to learn more about writing this sort of book, and musicians are willing to be interesting. (Corporate executives want to be dull role models.) You don’t have to be a fan of Donny Osmond’s music to appreciate his conflict between the music his fans wanted to hear and …

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BOOK REVIEW: Ben Marshall, “The Who: 50 Years – The Official History”

With all the incredible events, programs, releases and moments we’ve been fortunate enough to see, hear and experience this year, the 50th that The Who (as we knew and like to remember them), it was only fitting and appropriate that there would be a commemorative book – an official history.  And thus, there is.  The Who: 50 Years – The Official History, overseen by author Ben Marshall and sanctioned/assisted by Pete Townshend and Roger Daltrey has been released as the last piece of the puzzle. A beautiful, 320-page hardcover volume, it attempts to trace the history of the band from their beginnings as a friendship between Townshend and the late, great John Entwistle and Entwistle’s chance meeting with Roger Daltrey, who invited Entwistle to join his band.  The stories and legends are there – the beginning of the journey with other-worldly drummer Keith Moon; the changeover to Mod and becoming “The High Numbers” and the ascent, along with being managed by Kit Lambert and Chris Stamp.  The stories and legends are all well-known; there are …