All posts filed under: Like Omigod!

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Like, Omigod! Digging Through the ‘80s Pop Culture Box, Part 28

That’s all, amen, close the door. It’s the last roundup. The last tracks of the last disc of this seven-disc retrospective set. Before the final rundown, I need to drop the editorial “we” for a minute, and speak as myself. I’ve had a great time over the last half-year, putting this bad boy together every week, and I thank you all for doing it with me. I must acknowledge Dave Lifton, Dw. Dunphy, and Jon Cummings — who’ve been in there for every installment with me, knocking it out week after week — and to everybody else from the Popdose crew who’s dropped in along the way: to Rob and Boone and Chris and Keith, who stuck it out the longest; to the Matts and the Dans and the Mikes and the various Other Daves, to Joel and Annie and Will and Thierry and Ted, and to Jason and Jeff, and to Cory Frye for a little bit of inside baseball on the mailing list. You’ve all brought something to the party, even if it …

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Like, Omigod! Digging Through the ’80s Pop Culture Box, Part 27

New York, London, Paris, Munich, everybody talk about the back half of the final disc of this groundbreaking Rhino box set! #11 New Kids On the Block, “I’ll Be Loving You (Forever)” (1989) US #1, UK #5. Dave Lifton – It’s garbage, but I don’t really see a point, 25 years later, in picking on a band that was never going to appeal to me in the first place. Next. Dw. Dunphy – It is important to note just how vastly, hugely, mind-boggling successful these guys were. They had an army of girls at their command and weren’t afraid to use them at will. And it didn’t matter that this song made a eunuch choir sound like “The Super Bowl Shuffle” because they were singing it just… for.. .you, baby. Cummings – I remember standing in a record store in the Adams Morgan section of DC sometime in the early summer of 1988, as the clerk played “Please Don’t Go Girl” on the store’s sound system. With no marketing imagery to dissuade me in the …

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Like, Omigod! Digging Through the ‘80s Pop Culture Box, Part 26

Well, it’s been a quiet week in Omigodsville, out there on the edge of Popdose. It’s been hot. Seasonable. But you can feel the end of summer drawing in, and the phone calls have started, with the kids comparing notes, seeing who’s got who for homeroom. But the Big Four still find time to sit at the back of the café and talk about Eighties pop, hitting the midpoint of that last disc… #6 INXS, “What You Need” (1985) The band’s first US Top Ten, reaching #5. Dw. Dunphy – I picked up on INXS with the single “Listen Like Thieves” but didn’t totally get into them until “Never Tear Us Apart.” Regardless, “What You Need” and the rest of their stuff was an antidote to the oversynthed pop and rock that had, by this point, tipped beyond the tipping point and spilled all over. Jack Feerick – Quality. INXS are kind of disregarded, now — “taken for granted” would be a better term, I guess — which seems odd, because they were so good, …

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Like, Omigod! Digging Through the ’80s Pop Culture Box, Part 25

This week marks the true beginning of the end. At last, we have reached the final disc of this seven-disc compilation. There will be time for sober reflection later; for now, let’s plunge right ahead with the smack-talk, the petty sniping, the pointless bickering and the Mom jokes! (Yeah, we know what you like.) #1 Bananarama, “Venus” (1986) A cover of the song by the Shocking Blue. A #1 in the US, Canada, Australia, NZ, South Africa, and Switzerland – though it only hit #8 in the UK. Jack Feerick – This marks our second altercation with the UK production team of Stock, Aitken and Waterman, who sent seemingly dozens of dance-poppers to the top of the charts, none of whom you would later be able to pick out of a police line-up. Rick Astley is probably their most notorious creation. But unlike the studio tea-boy that the trio transformed into a pop idol on a bet (or so the legend goes), Bananarama had a career before SAW got hold of them, doing quirky, slightly …

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Like, Omigod! Digging Through the ’80s Pop Culture Box, Part 24

As we wrap up Disc Six and head for the final reckoning, we’ll just quote an email comment from our own David Medsker, when he got a look at this week’s line-up:  “Aiiieeeeeeee!” About sums it up, really. #16 Harold Faltermeyer, “Axel F” (1985) From the soundtrack to Beverly Hills Cop. #3 US, #2 UK. Dw. Dunphy – Could be worse. It is a pop track that’s terribly easy to just go along with, but while it has that quality going for it and would guarantee it some level of public affinity, I have to wonder why it was so big. I’m guessing that at this point people were so into the whole Eddie Murphy/Axel Foley thing that the song would have needed to be super-mediocre to fail. So I don’t feel too badly about liking it, but the public interest scale is out of proportion. Jon Cummings – It’s better than “Miami Vice Theme.” It’s not as good as the hit single from Beverly Hills Cop 2, “I Want Your Sex.” The song in …

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Like, Omigod! Digging Through the ’80s Pop Culture Box, Part 23

We’re well into the home stretch of Disc Six now, and I hope you’re all rested up — because this week, we’re BRINGIN’ THE PAIN. #11 Mr. Mister, “Kyrie” (1985) Number One in the US, Canada, and Norway; #11 UK. Jon Cummings – Everything about this is awful. OK, not everything — the melody in the chorus is nice and powerful. But the burbly synths in the verses are dreck, the lyrics are inane when they’re not ridiculous (“When I was young I thought of growing old / And what my life would mean to me” … really? No shit! That’s profound…), the “dramatic” touches lose their drama completely when piled so relentlessly atop one another, etc., etc. I hated Mr. Mister. It’s been well over a quarter century since I allowed this to get past the first a cappella “Eleison” before hitting the radio tuner, and if I have my way I’ll never get past it again. Jack Feerick – LA studio cats with pop chops and a not-so-hidden fascination for fusion say, “Hey, …

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Like, Omigod! Digging Through the ’80s Pop Culture Box, Part 22

Me and my mates, we think you’re great… and some we love and some we hate. #6 ‘til tuesday, “Voices Carry” (1985) Reached #8 in the Hot 100. Jack Feerick – A tough one, for me. ‘til Tuesday (all lowercase is dumb) were one of my first shows — longtime readers of Digging For Gold will recall that I saw them sort of by accident — and those three albums have some of my favorite songwriting of the ‘80s. But “Voices Carry” is just about my least-favorite track from the first record. Jon Cummings – My understanding is that the band’s experience with this song was something of a train wreck, right from the start: the record company forced Mann to change the perspective in the lyric, they weren’t happy with the production, et cetera. Of course, I’m sure the money alleviated some of those concerns. But ‘til Tuesday (and Mann, more generally) is Exhibit A for the old adage “never underestimate the stupidity of the people,” because as they (and she) got better and …

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Like, Omigod! Digging Through the ’80s Pop Culture Box, Part 21

We’re on to Disc Six of this seven-disc set this week, and man oh man do these silly pop songs elicit some strong opinions. Put your helmets on, kids, cos we’ve got a passel of fightstarters this go-round… #1 Animotion, “Obsession” (1984) A Top Ten around the English-speaking world, peaking at #7 US. Feerick – Another cast-off from the 1983 flop movie A Night in Heaven, sort of; Michael DesBarres and Holly Knight wrote and sang this for the soundtrack. Their version went nowhere, til they gave it to Animotion, who blew it up huge. Poor Michael DesBarres; relegated to footnote status again. Medsker – It’s all about the 12″ mix to me for this one. The album version is flat and airy, but the remix has some serious balls. Cummings – Certainly a candidate for Worst Music Video Ever Attached To A Top-10 Hit. Yet “Obsession,” for all the ickiness of its general theme and lyrical specifics, is somehow awesome — a classic that doesn’t seem to age. In its era it found a …

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Like, Omigod! Digging Through the ’80s Pop Culture Box, Part 20

Greetings, chronic argonauts! We’ll be stepping into the time machine in just a moment, and once we do we’re mostly going to let the music do the talking. But we wanted to take a moment to think some deep thoughts about history and nostalgia. It started when Friend of Popdose and All-Around Internet Swell Guy Andrew Weiss sent us a link to the archives of SPIN — their review of the Like, Omigod! box set, written by Jesse Berrett upon its original release in 2002. It’s worth reading in full, but a couple of lines jump out… … “Nothing about the ‘80s was naive.” Even pop’s exuberant synth-bleeps throbbed with dread. That may explain why the renewed vogue for those sounds coincided with an unwelcome ‘80s revival in the culture at large (Enron, terrorism, the threat of nuclear war). But of the 142 songs included on Like Omigod!, only one. Nena’s “99 Luftballons,” has much to say about apocalypse. As a result, Like Omigod! is a sunny retro fetish object itself — totally ‘90s, if …

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Like, Omigod! Digging Through the ’80s Pop Culture Box, Part 19

Rounding the horn into the back half of Disc Five of this 7-disc set, things get (mildly) funky, we talk a little about race, and Jack makes a dick joke. So, you know. The usual. #11 Bryan Adams, “Heaven” (1983) Recorded for the soundtrack to a little-remembered 1983 film, this hit the Number One spot in June 1985, over a year and a half after its initial release. Feerick – I give Bryan Adams tremendous props for remaining a public figure for 30+ years while giving virtually nothing away about his personal life. That in itself is a pretty remarkable achievement. Certainly moreso than his terrible music, which is meat-and-potatoes rock with a fatally-skewed ratio of potatoes to meat. It fills your ears up, but does not nourish them. A jillion hit singles, and only one of them has any substance — and it ain’t this one. (“Run To You,” if you were wondering.) Medsker – I get its appeal, but it never appealed to me. My brother loved turning it into something Gilbert O’Sullivan …

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Like, Omigod! Digging Through the ‘80s Pop Culture Box, Part 18

An assortment of big hits and fazed cookies this week, as we make our way to the midpoint of Disc Five… #6 Corey Hart, “Sunglasses At Night” (1983) A Top Ten in the US, but peaked only at #24 in Hart’s native Canada. Feerick – I’ve actually liked some other things that Hart has done, in a guilty-pleasure sort of way — “Never Surrender” still hits my buttons — but this bites “Sweet Dreams (Are Made Of This)” too blatantly for me to enjoy it even ironically. Hart’s got a little nothing of a voice, with working modalities of either a marble-mouthed mumble or a sore-throat yell; when he sticks to the former he’s fine, but he leans too heavily on the latter here. He’s got decent taste in bass players — his early singles have some nice slippery fretless work — but the screaming RAWK! guitars are just evidence that he’s trying too hard. I was surprised to learn, some years back, that Corey Hart is good friends with wackadoo cult genius Jane Siberry. …

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Like, Omigod! Digging Through the ’80s Pop Culture Box, Part 17

Once more unto the breach, dear friends! As we cracked open Disc Five of this 7-disc mammoth, releasing a faint mingled scent of Pop Rocks, Aqua Net, and the  first edition D&D Monster Manual, that eternal champion Dw. Dunphy was heard to say, “I’m fairly confident the series readership will call this one of the better weeks. I would now like to disabuse them of that notion.” GAUNTLET: THROWN! #1 Yes, “Owner of a Lonely Heart” (1983) The band’s only Number One. Jack Feerick – So, Trevor Horn. We meet again. Dw. Dunphy – I’ve already said way too much about this song. Just two thoughts are: I can still enjoy it as much as I ever had; and in the context of BritPop at the time this was pretty well within the sphere of all the rest. That’s not a put-down, either. This may be the only time in Yes’ existence where they were truly “contemporary.” Dave Lifton – A good ’80s rock song, but a lousy Yessong. I don’t mind this, but I’d …

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Like, Omigod! Digging Through the ’80s Pop Culture Box, Part 16

A glimpse at the editing process for this column — stop that snickering, you at the back, this thing absolutely does get edited — as we wrap up Disc 4 of this seven-disc set. Dunphy – (noticing typos) Addendum 2: ” they we’re fugly too” — Freudian slip. I’m writing with a mirror in front of me. Feerick – I was going to fix that in the revision, but now I’m not so sure… Dunphy – Leave it. Hell, start the column with it. I ain’t got no alibi. #16 The Cure, “Let’s Go To Bed” (1982) Did not chart in the US. Peaked at #44 UK, though it charted highest — reaching all the way to #15 — in Australia. (See comment) (Dodgy quality because UMG are dicks.) Jon Cummings – We lead off this week with a curious choice — so curious that one wonders whether there was a rights issue involved, or whether Robert Smith traded access to this particular song in exchange for nothing more than a vat of makeup and …

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Like, Omigod! Digging Through the ’80s Pop Culture Box, Part 15

Having passed the halfway mark on Disc Four, we’re officially into the back half of the series — though still in the front half of the decade… #11 Big Country, “In a Big Country” (1983) Peaked at #17 in the Hot 100. Reached #3 in Canada, a bigger country than the US. Jon Cummings – I guess we’re all supposed to defer to Mr. Giles here, so I’ll just say, man, we thought those bagpipe guitars were cool. Shah! Jack Feerick – Jesus, take the wheel; I can’t even pretend to be objective about these guys. Big Country may not have been an important band per se, but they were important to me. They made two-and-a-half genuinely great albums, and even if their drop-off was quick and steep, I will always give them a pass for that. They weren’t afraid of uplift, they weren’t afraid of optimism, and they gave me strength during some times in my life when I needed strength. Our own Mike Duquette makes the case better than ever I could. That …

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Like, Omigod! Digging Through the ’80s Pop Culture Box, Part 14

A milestone, of sorts: This week, as we reach the midway point of Disc 4 of this seven-disc box set, we’re at the official halfway mark of the series. And we’re only up to… 1983? #6 Martin Briley, “The Salt In My Tears” (1983) Peaked at #36 in the Hot 100. Jack Feerick – Hey, it’s Bug from Uncle Buck all grown up! Dw. Dunphy – Perfectly serviceable 80s power-pop with a video that answers the question: whatever happened to Bob Welch’s beret? Briley reminded me of what you might get if Graham Parker fronted John Waite’s solo band. Dan Wiencek – Funny you should say that, because I was just about to add that this reminded me of a slightly less acidic version of Graham Parker’s “Local Girls.” Which is not at all a bad thing. Feerick – Yes, but how much is the salt in your tears actually worth? Salt was once worth a great deal, actually; Roman soldiers, as any fule kno, were once paid in the stuff, which gives us our …

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Like, Omigod! Digging Through the ’80s Pop Culture Box, Part 13

Here’s where we start digging into Disc 4 of the seven-disc box set Like, Omigod! The ’80s Pop Culture Box (Totally). Let’s waste no time — grab your shovels and let’s go! #1 Greg Kihn Band, “Jeopardy” (1983) US #2; Kihn’s only Top Ten hit. Dave Lifton – An average song made palatable because of the clavinet. Damn, I miss that instrument. Dw. Dunphy – I like “The Breakup Song” better — even though it is essentially the chords of “(Don’t Fear) The Reaper” repositioned into a different tune — but ‘Jeopardy” is okay. It doesn’t really grab me, and I have to believe more people would be familiar with the Weird Al parody over the original. Jack Feerick – Well, it’s hard for me to be objective on this’n — for reasons I hope should be obvious — but I do believe I prefer the Weird Al. Jon Cummings – Considering that “The Breakup Song” is, I think most people agree, a slightly (at least) better song than this one — and considering that …

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Like, Omigod! Digging Through the ’80s Pop Culture Box, Part 12

A super-sized fun-pak to round out Disc 3! #16 Bertie Higgins, “Key Largo” (1982) Billboard Top Ten; #1 adult contemporary. Jon Cummings – My secret shame: Bertie Higgins made me watch Bogart movies for the first time when I was in high school. If I had been just a bit older, I probably would have let Rupert Holmes talk me into drinking my first pina colada. It’s not fair that such wonderful things are attached to such yucky music. Jack Feerick – Rupert Holmes made me watch The King of Comedy. Wait — I’m sorry, that was Rupert Pupkin. Well, same difference. Chris Holmes – I’m sure much fun will be had at the bearded one’s expense, but let me just say I really like this song. Granted, I have some decidedly personal and non-musical reasons for feeling that way, but isn’t that always the way with music? Speaking of which, one of these months I really must get around to another one of those columns. Feerick – *nods head vigorously* Dw. Dunphy – This …

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Like, Omigod! Digging Through the ’80s Pop Culture Box, Part 11

We’re down to a bit of a skeleton crew this week as we continue plowing through Disc Three of this seven-disc set — which probably shouldn’t be surprising, considering what we have to work with. Dunphy sums it up best: “There are maybe two songs on this list I could be bothered with on my own, and one of those is probably if I was stuck in a shopping mall.” # 11 Bow Wow Wow, “I Want Candy” (1982) Peaked at #22 on Billboard’s Hot Rock Tracks, but a Top Ten in the UK. Ted Asregadoo – How do you cross a punk look with a song that’s one big pop hook? The answer is clearly Bow Wow Wow’s cover of this 1965 tune. It was a kind of gateway song for those who loved pop music, but wanted to feel somewhat rebellious by embracing the punk fashion in the video. The fact that the song has endured for decades after its release in 1982 just goes to show you that despite the rather dated …

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Like, Omigod! Digging Through the ’80s Pop Culture Box, Part 10

We’re letting the music do the talking for the most part, this week — because this stretch of Disc Three is all killer, no filler! Or, as panelist Mike Heyliger put it, “If I was making a list of my 100 or so favorite songs of the ’80s (ooh, there’s an idea,) then three of this week’s five tracks would be on it.” #6, Missing Persons, “Words” (1982) Peaked at #42 US, though it was a Top Ten hit in Australia. Dw. Dunphy – I like the energy of the song and I think Dale Bozzio does a pretty good singing job here, but her Lene Lovich-isms get on my nerves after awhile. I lump this song in with “Jukebox (Don’t Put Another Dime)” by The Flirts, and have no sensible reason for why that should be. Ted Asregadoo – Terry Bozzio’s drumming talents were surprisingly muted on “Words” and other songs by Missing Persons. Perhaps it was the complexity of working with Frank Zappa that motivated the Terry and Dale to move toward a …

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Like, Omigod! Digging Through the ’80s Pop Culture Box, Part 9

And it’s on to Disc 3 of this seven-disc compilation — and it looks like we’ve pinpointed the moment when the ‘80s become, irrevocably, “The Eighties”… #1 Duran Duran, “Hungry Like the Wolf” (1982) #3 US Jack Feerick – This was never my favorite Duran2 track — it was “Rio,” for me, where it all came together — but the things that made the band work are in full evidence; big, muscular bassline, strategic jabs of guitar, sequencers clicking away like a popcorn popper, drums cutting a perfect middle ground between disco propulsion and rock ‘n’ roll swagger, and the whole thing could veer from funky to spacey on a dime. Dw. Dunphy – I was more into “Save A Prayer,” myself, but who could refuse “Hungry Like The Wolf” while it was playing? Duran Squared was not the instigators of the style movement of pop in the ’80s but they certainly were one of the highest profiled practitioners. It helped that, initially, they were also a really great band. A couple albums down the …

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Like, Omigod! Digging Through the ’80s Pop Culture Box, Part 8

Before we even get into this selection of songs — the conclusion of Disc Two, for those of you playing along at home — this exchange… Dw. Dunphy – Two “legit” songs, a TV show theme and two songs I consider novelties. I miss the ’80s. Jon Cummings – Which two are “legit”? The one that talks about a woman who’ll “chew you up,” and includes the line “The woman is wild, woo-oo-oo-ooo-oo”? Or the one that includes videogame bomb sounds? That’s the great thing about the ’80s — even the “legit” songs sounded like novelties. #16 Hall & Oates, “Maneater” (1982) Topped the Hot 100 for four weeks. Cummings – I’ve never been fully on board with Hall & Oates’ biggest hit, despite the fact that they were my favorite (current) group when I was in high school. “Maneater” fits squarely into my “Daryl Hall overreach” box, what with its panoply of vocal tics, dodgy lyrics and general misogyny. But then, the track is pretty much all about that bassline and sax solo, so …

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Like, Omigod! Digging Through the ’80s Pop Culture Box, Part 7

Funk, power pop, adult contemporary, Eurodisco — there’s a little something for everybody this week! Or, as Dw. Dunphy (who is never at a loss for words) put it, “I HAVE NEVER LOVED ANYTHING QUITE LIKE I LOVE THIS LIST. Or, well, it’s kinda nice.” #11 Rick James, “Super Freak (part 1)” (1981) #1 on the dance charts, #16 Hot 100. Dan Wiencek – With a riff like that, could this have not been a hit? Well, given Hammer’s subsequent appropriation of it, I guess we can conclude the answer is no. I’m kind of a downer on most of this week’s entries, so let me put it in black and white: this is killer. I’m not enough of an expert on funk/R&B to categorically state that this is the last of the “old school” tracks to strike it big before Purple Rain completely changed what R&B sounded like, but that’s how I remember it. Kind of a shame that most young people now think of Rick James as a punchline on Chapelle’s Show. (Not …

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Like, Omigod! Digging Through the ’80s Pop Culture Box, Part 6

Oof. This week’s batch of songs are – well, they’re certainly songs that were on the radio in the 1980s. #6 Billy Vera and the Beaters, “At This Moment” (1981) Peaked at #79 on its initial release; the 1987 re-release hit #1 Hot 100 and Adult Contemporary. Dw. Dunphy – I’m going to get slaughtered by the hardcore Billy Vera fans out there (gotta be some of those, right?) but this is one of the most desperate, teeth-grindingly bathetic songs ever. Vera has made a decent living as a sitcom theme song singer and this track, though not recorded for a sitcom, came to power as Alex P. Keaton’s love song in Family Ties. Matt Wardlaw – There’s at least one hardcore fan of BV, Dunphy. Watch yourself! Jack Feerick – You’re a hardcore fan of bacterial vaginosis? Mike Heyliger – As good as heartbroken, blue-eyed soul gets. I’ve sung this one loudly to no one in particular during many of my moments of infatuation and heartbreak, although my favorite memory of the song has …

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Like, Omigod! Digging Through the ‘80s Pop Culture Box, Part 5

We’re back in the ring to take another swing, and ain’t nothin’ left to it but to do it. Let’s dig straight into Disc Two of this seven-disc compilation. After the throat-clearing and ground-laying of Disc One, we’re shaking off that long Seventies hangover of with a batch of songs that show us, finally, “The Eighties” in full bloom, for better and for worse. Wisecrack of the week: Dw. Dunphy, upon taking his first look at this list, was heard to mutter, “Holy moley. So many punching bags and so few fists.” #1 Billy Idol, “Dancing With Myself” (1981) Originally released by Idol’s band Generation X; rerecorded for Idol’s debut solo single. Reached #2 on the Billboard “Bubbling Under” Hot 100, #27 Hot Dance Club Play. Dw. Dunphy – Hooray for songs that can be misinterpreted! Idol would obviously record better, and much worse, in following years. It’s not that the track is terrible so much as it sets off the puerile 11-year-old in me that giggles as Idol sings, seemingly without a hint of …

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Like, Omigod! Digging Through the ‘80s Pop Culture Box, Part 4

It’s a super-sized extravaganza this week as we wrap up Disc One, and man oh man have we got the Kojak variety pack here. Sit back and enjoy… #16 Gary Numan, “Cars” (1980) Numan’s first solo single; #1 UK, #1 Canada, #9 US. Dan Wiencek – I have an ex who was really into Gary Numan, and so I’m in the unusual position of knowing a lot about an artist who I’m actually not a huge fan of. I actually respect Numan for making a lot of career out of rather modest talents, and I don’t mean that in a snarky way: he admits he’s not much of a composer, and he’s certainly not much of a singer, and yet he put together arguably THE biggest one-hit wonder ever made, a song that’s been a hit in every decade since it was first released. (Obviously the “one-hit” status does not apply in the UK, where Numan continued to rack ’em up throughout the ’80s.) Taken in the context of Numan’s work, it’s so much more …

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Like, Omigod! Digging Through the ’80s Pop Culture Box, Part 3

Still on Disc One of this compilation, and get a load of this line-up! This may, in fact, be the single Mellow Gold-iest article we’ve ever done or will ever do on Popdose. #11 Air Supply, “Lost In Love” (1980) #3 in the Hot 100, #1 Adult Contemporary. Chris Holmes – I was fairly oblivious to the whole Air Supply phenomenon, although I think my mom had one of their cassettes. Something with a hot air balloon on it perhaps? Anyway, I guess this is a great song for someone who heard “I’m Not in Love” and thought, “You know, I really did like that 10cc song but it was just a bit too intense.” Jack Feerick – The opening acoustic guitar briefly threatens something elegant and folky. No such luck. What “Lost In Love” does demonstrate, though, is how much country-and-western is in Air Supply’s musical DNA. That loping rhythm, the pinpoint bass, the occasional overplaying of bored sessionmen, the overload of keyboard fairy-dust — all of it, straight outta Nashville, for better and …

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Like, Omigod! Digging through the ‘80s Pop Culture Box, Part 2

Early hip-hop! Leftover classic rock! Italian sex disco! Racist tomfoolery! And the luckiest bar band in the Midwest! All in our continuing crawl through Disc One of this seven-disc set! #6 Kurtis Blow, “The Breaks (part 1)” #87 Billboard Hot 100, #4 Billboard R&B chart, #9 Billboard Dance chart. Dw. Dunphy – I didn’t have contact with a lot of rap at that stage, and what I did have was primarily Grandmaster Flash and Grandmaster Melle Mel. All of which is to say that “classic” rap sounds absolutely nothing like what it eventually became. This song, while fun on its own merits, also kind of sounds like every white male adult from 1981-1987 who said “I can also do that rapping thing too! I’m your uncle and I’m here to say…!” David Lifton – I actually heard an attempt like that at white rapping fairly recently. No, it wasn’t by me. Chris Holmes – If there’s one area where my musical knowledge is woefully inadequate it’s rap/hip hop, especially the early stuff. That said: This …

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Like, Omigod! Digging Through the ’80s Pop Culture Box, Part 1

Welcome to OMG!, our brand-new roundtable series, where a gathering of your favorite Popdose writers (and, um, Jack Feerick) come together to spout ill-considered opinions about our pop-music heritage! When the long-running Digging For Gold wrapped up, bringing us to the end of Time-Life Music’s AM Gold series of compilations, we spent some time casting about for a new group project. There are many excellent music anthology collections we could have chosen, and the Popdose staff argued the merits of them back and forth in lively email exchanges. The AM Gold series had brought us up to 1979, and we knew that we wanted to continue to look at pop history going chronologically forward. And of all the tasteful, thematically-selected, painstakingly-curated collections of 1980s pop available on the market, we selected… none of them; we decided to go with the Rhino Records compilation Like, Omigod! The ’80s Pop Culture Box (Totally), instead. One of the joys (?) of AM Gold was trying to second-guess the programmers who put the set together. To say that not …