Death by Power Ballad: Robin Zander, “Time Will Let You Know”

Wouldn’t it be cool to be Cheap Trick’s Robin “The Voice” Zander?  I mean, the guy’s, like, 85 years old and looks the same as he did on the cover of Heaven Tonight; he can probably still woo any chick he wants from his nightly audience; and, even though he’s probably tired of singing “I Want You to Want Me” every night, he gets to sing “I Want You to Want Me” every night and hear the wildly appreciative applause of the dozens of people (or thousands, if he’s opening for Journey) who’ve come to hear him sing “I Want You to Want Me.”

But Robin Zander has a sensitive side, too. Exhibit A: “The Flame.” I absolutely love “The Flame.”  There is nobody else—and I mean nobody else—who could take a line as bad as “Whenever you need someone to lay your heart and head upon” and make it sound like a bolt from Zeus himself. Cheap Trick take a lot of shit for recording it, but if there is shit to be taken, it should be Bob Mitchell and Nick Graham, who wrote the thing, partaking of said excrement. Cheap Trick turned their slow dance-by-numbers ditty into a towering achievement in the power ballad arts.

In 1993, Zander released a guest-heavy solo album, which did about as well as Cheap Trick’s studio output of the era (Woke Up with a Montster, anyone?). Amid the poppy hooks and all star cameos (Maria McKee, Dr. John, Stevie Nicks, and most of Tom Petty’s Heartbreakers), Zander placed “Time Will Let You Know,” a Big Statement treatise on taking the great leap of faith and allowing oneself to fall in love. Composed by Zander and someone named Billy O. Who (gotta be a pseudonym, like Prince on those Apollonia 6 and Martika albums—put your guesses in the Comments section), “Time” bundles hope, longing, and resignation to the fates in one massive lighter-worthy package.

The track starts quietly—just Zander and a piano, addressing the object of his affection in hushed exasperation:

Look at you and look at me
Now what are we supposed to be
We’re so afraid of something new
You know it’s true

You turn around and then it’s gone
You can’t be sure if it’s the same old song
We’re so afraid of everyone
Afraid of the sun

There’s a maturity here that is quite stunning in the context of the power ballad form. Zander, a freshly minted 40-year-old at the time, isn’t merely chasing tail, looking for a quick lay, offering himself for the laying upon of heart or head. It’s a weary sentiment, a weariness of wariness, of the fear that keeps one from taking the chance on something as potentially transforming as finding the love of one’s life, after a lifetime of disappointments. “Please let this be love,” he pleads in the buildup to the chorus, and The Voice so plainly bears the sadness of those disappointments, the weight is almost too much for the song to hold up. There needs to be a release worthy of the weight.

The chorus more than fits the bill. Zander goes into that glorious upper register as strings and acoustic guitars swirl around him. The lyrics are a study in conflict, first acknowledging the active participation required in commencing a relationship (“It’s all up to me / It’s all up to you”), then resigning himself to the fate of the moment (Whatever will be / Whatever you do / Time will let you know). That tag line—“Time will let you know”—comes across as authoritative and delicate all at once, as Zander takes on all that weight by himself.

Back into the second verse, he notes the passage of time and the unavoidability of aging:

You see your folks and all their friends
Ain’t it funny how the story ends
You wonder why they’re hanging on
When it’s gone

What can you do? he seems to ask. A chance lost is impossible to regain. The verse is particularly poignant on the live version of “Time” included on Cheap Trick’s live album Silver. Delivered by Zander’s daughter, Holland, the verse is played as The Voice’s younger self (albeit, in a female version of himself—Zander is nothing if not sensitive guy) addressing his older counterpart.

Back on the studio version, the chorus returns, a mixture of multiple Zanders and an actual gospel choir. Suddenly, what was authoritative and delicate mere seconds before becomes doubly authoritative, triply so on the third go-round (after the requisite guitar solo) as the Zanders fall back and the choir is given full rein to testify behind The Voice. Overblown?  Probably. In the hack hands of, say, Michael Bolton, such a setting would serve as a license to go into full histrionic mode and caterwaul away until a merciful fadeout. Zander, however, melds into the greater collective, and gains more power as a result.

And then … there’s quiet again. Ending the song as he began it, Zander repeats the first verse with just voice and piano. The soft-loud-soft dynamic complete, The Voice falls silent once more, drawing a satisfying conclusion to his most satisfying midlife meditation.




  • http://www.popdose.com DwDunphy

    Zander is indeed either blessed or lucky or both. Think of album rock's three greatest voices of the '70s: Zander, Kansas' Steve Walsh and Boston's Brad Delp. Delp's gone, Walsh sounds like he washes down glass sandwiches with a fifth of lit kerosene now, but Zander sounds exactly the same…

  • EightE1

    Cigarettes have sapped him of some of the upper register (though he's not as bad off as Lou Gramm is these days), but he can still bring it live.

    Poor Steve Walsh. Someone should have warned him about the glass sandwiches.

    Rob
    EightE1

  • http://www.popdose.com jefito

    Does Walsh still have that braided prog chin-beard he was sporting 10 years ago? That thing was awesome.

  • http://www.popdose.com DwDunphy

    Ugh. Probably.

  • http://banophernalia.com Jevon

    Glad to see this overlooked Zander solo effort get some attention. It was an album I played a lot years ago. And yes, I did get Woke Up With A Monster too, although that was a mercy purchase…

    Jevon
    banophernalia.com

    PS Tell Dunphy he needs to get more.

  • Steve

    Brilliant, so glad I stumbled upon this site! Zander's record is sublime and amazing at the same time.

    And Woke Up With A Monster does have a couple of gems on it (like virtually EVERY Cheap Trick record)

  • dom

    I love what you wrote. I agree with you in a lot of places. The part, “…weariness of wariness…” and so on and what you call “sadness” or “weight”, I do understand. Thank you for your excellent interpretation.

  • dom

    I love what you wrote. I agree with you in a lot of places. The part, “…weariness of wariness…” and so on and what you call “sadness” or “weight”, I do understand. Thank you for your excellent interpretation.

  • Anneke

    Robin at 85, will still look and sound better than any other man to me :). Time will let you know…fantastic song, by my favorite singer in the whole wide world.
    Glad I get to celebrate your birthday with you Saturday Robin! (no….not his 85th…yet….but I will be there too!)

  • Anneke

    Robin at 85, will still look and sound better than any other man to me :). Time will let you know…fantastic song, by my favorite singer in the whole wide world.
    Glad I get to celebrate your birthday with you Saturday Robin! (no….not his 85th…yet….but I will be there too!)

  • Sheryl Ann

    And to think, that Cheap Trick tickets are going for an average of $70+ in 2011. That’s during a recession, even while all of the other artists from the same heyday period are having to lower their ticket prices substantially to fill empty seats, & still end up having to cancel shows. This attests to Robin’s skills. Yes, he’s ‘The Voice.’

    And, he didn’t just start by getting up & singing in front of a band. He was properly trained, started out in the most advanced choir during high school, sang folk music professionally once he graduated, before getting snatched up by Cheap Trick.

    Once I read something about when he was young that one of his singing teachers saying to drink a shot of whisky before a performance to protect his voice. It would be considered criminal to give such advice nowadays. Looks to me like it worked. The man still hits all of the notes & still can send shivers down the spine.

    Excellent review, thoughtful & full of insight.

    BTW: Robin has a second solo album due out in March 2011. It’s available for pre order on Amazon. It’s called ‘Countryside Blvd.’ It was recorded almost two years ago in Nashville with a lot of guests. Robin’s on the cover in front of an old pickup in jeans & cowboy hat, so this should be interesting.

    It’s less than $13 with a price guarantee that if the Amazon price of it goes down between now & the end of release day, they’ll refund the difference. Since iTunes doesn’t carry his first album, I wasn’t not going to wait to see if they were going to carry the new one.