Formerly of the band Pardner, Atlanta music scene veteran Bret Busch is set to launch his new album, Pills Lace & Confetti, on July 14. The album, which has been seeding singles out in the pop music landscape since early-May, promises a mix of humid, island nights and no shortage of knowing nods and asides.

Busch has somehow found himself orbiting the world of The New Pornographers. Busch has shared bills previously with Neko Case, and has performed many times alongside Case’s backup singer and frequent collaborator Kelly Hogan (who appeared on a handful of songs on New Pornos album Brill Bruisers). The new record includes contributions from Destroyer’s Joseph Shabason. (FYI: Destroyer is the umbrella title for solo work from Dan Bejar, a previous member of New Pornos.)  Janelle Monae percussionist Rafael Pereira contributes as well. The record was produced by Rock*A*Teens bassist Will Joiner.

Busch said of this collective, and the tropicalia-flavored track “Small Town Fight” from  Pills Lace & Confetti: “With this (song) we were looking for a playful vibe that could still exhibit the talents of the band. Rafael (Pereira) played a variety of Brazilian percussion instruments which set the mood for the cool jazz sax from Joseph (Shabason). The flutes, vibes and marimba behind the male and female vocals hopefully painted an almost psychedelic rainbow. We’ll let the absurd lyrics stand on their own.”

Popdose asked Busch and co-producer Joiner to share with us some of the musical influences that got them to this album. We’re pretty sure you’ll be surprised by what they added to their Spotify playlist.

Bret Busch

  • Destroyer: Kaputt
  • Asia: Heat of the Moment
  • Tim Buckley: Buzzin’ Fly (Dream Letter Version)
  • Kate Bush: Delius
  • George Michael/Aretha Franklin: I Knew You Were Waiting (For Me)

Will Joiner

  • Wings: Let ‘Em In
  • Tom Zé: Doi
  • Christopher Cross: Arthur’s Theme
  • Jorge Ben Jor: Os Alquimistas Estão Chegando
  • The “Green Acres” Theme

We couldn’t let Will Joiner off the hook without explaining why he included the Green Acres Theme to his list: “Ha-ha! The song is an attempt at a humorous approach to the classic Aesop fable The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse, which according to the Googles dates back to a Greek fable.  The Green Acres Theme is the only other musical adaptation of the premise that I know of.”