All posts tagged: 90s

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ALBUM REVIEW: Built To Spill, “Untethered Moon”

From the first tub thumps of the drums into the guitar sludge on the opening track, you know you’re in for a good ride on this, the long-awaited new album from Boise’s “indie” vets, Built To Spill, led by their mainstay, Doug Martsch.   Crisp production, sonic guitar interplay and punchy vocals make this a satisfying listen through the ten tracks. The starter, “All Our Songs” has a rollicking gallop; a strident pace with a frenetic guitar strum that plays perfectly with the frenzied solo guitar figures that weave around the melody and the bassline – a rock & roll call to arms; “Living Zoo” is angular and tense but catchy, with a lot of twin guitar assault until the bouncy melody kicks in with the vocals and “On The Way” sounds like The Shins may have learned a thing or two from this band… (!)  “Never Be The Same” is radio-friendly pop with a slightly sinister edge; “Another Day” sounds like it would be a companion to something off Dinosaur Jr.’s Bug and “Horizon …

Lisa Loeb

The Popdose Interview: Lisa Loeb

With the renewed popularity of female-fronted alternative rock, New Found Glory guitarist Chad Gilbert saw a window of opportunity to bring ‘90s alt-rocker Lisa Loeb, a noted influence for many of those same artists, back around to file a new chapter in her own discography of work. Gilbert, a longtime fan of Loeb’s music, knew exactly the kind of album that fellow fans would want to hear from Lisa and he also knew that fans had been waiting for quite a while. Loeb had been wrapped up in a variety of projects which had carried her away from making the “adult” music that brought her name recognition, starting in 1994 with “Stay,” the  #1 Grammy-nominated hit which served as her musical moment of introduction to the outside world. Having developed a healthy career of his own outside of New Found Glory as a producer, Gilbert had the right resume and experience to tackle the job and he was bold in his approach. He emailed Loeb to say “I know you do these kids books, but …

The Popdose Interview: Michael Gomoll of Joey’s Song

Michael Gomoll was someone that I first came to know in the early ’90s when we started trading bootleg tapes of concerts. Mike was a huge Del Amitri fan and folks like Mike were hard to come across in the early days of the internet, so we found some big time common ground on the Dels and a few other artists. As it often does, time passed and I lost touch with Mike and many of my old school tape trading buddies, replaced with the advent of trading those same shows online via BitTorrent and high speed internet downloads. I shared some good times, music and stories with those friends  and as time has gone on, I’ve started to hunt down some of them to get back in touch and see what they’re up to.  I found Michael on Facebook, shot him a friend request and quickly got an email that my friend request had been accepted. When I went on to his page, I saw quite a few wall posts about something called Joey’s …

Bootleg City: Elastica in Europe, 1994-’95

Greetings, citizens of Bootleg City. It’s an honor being the first female interim mayor of this fair ‘burg. But perhaps you’re wondering how I snagged this plush gig. No no no, it’s nothing like that. Apparently I wowed Mayor Cass with my Material Issue-honoring radio show and my ability to speak fluent Genesis and anti-REO Speedwagon haikus. My impeccable harmonies during the Hall & Oates sing-along at the Popdose Christmas party likely didn’t hurt matters, either. I’ll tell you, though — being this city’s first lady interim mayor is no easy task. Mayor Cass left his office a mess when he hightailed it out of town last month for his “vacation.” We’re talking crumpled, never-sent fan letters to Jon Anderson, a Time-Life collection of ’80s music gathering dust in the corner, and a dart-riddled photo of Matt Wardlaw behind the door. And his bathroom reading material — you don’t even want to know.

Book Review: “Grunge Is Dead: The Oral History of Seattle Rock Music”

It’s hard to believe (for those of us who lived it, anyway) that it’s been fifteen years since Kurt Cobain committed suicide. On April 5th, 1994, the Seattle native left the world with the same cold-water shock his band Nirvana had on the world when the album Nevermind broke in 1991. Some people saw Cobain’s death as inevitable; the signs were certainly there: There was the working title for 1994’s In Utero (a.k.a. I Hate Myself and I Want to Die). The lyrics for “All Apologies.” A prophetic MTV Unplugged set list (the caterwaul dénouement in “Where Did You Sleep Last Night?” still sends chills up the spine). A near-fatal drug/alcohol overdose in Rome during a European tour. Those Courtney Love divorce rumblings. Quite a hit parade. But to a larger degree, Cobain’s death has become a coda-like representation in our pop culture vernacular as the beginning of the end for the “grunge” era in Seattle. Greg Prato’s new book Grunge is Dead: The Oral History of Seattle Rock Music disagrees. The book attempts to …