All posts tagged: Alan Moore

gatsby

10 Movies…That Are Insane Adaptations of Famous Books (To Prepare You For the New ‘Great Gatsby’)

I haven’t seen The Great Gatsby yet, but I can tell already that it just doesn’t add up. The production seems to have missed the point—it’s not about the glitz and glamor and pop songs—it’s about the death of dreams and the danger of being a complete and total sellout, ironically enough. Here are 10 other literary adaptations that were kind of out of control. His Dark Materials: The Golden Compass (2007) When you adapt a children’s fantasy novel about goin’ off to kill God, you kind of have to tone that down for the multiplex audiences, and put a lot of polar bears on the promo materials. The Great Gatsby (1974) It’s happened before! Gatsby (Robert Redford) is a leering douchebag who is still in love with Daisy, and we can’t understand why, because Mia Farrow plays her as a hysteric gasbag. And while Luhrmann’s adaptation seems to favor color and sparkles, this movie is just a sea of white and a celebration of nostalgia—ironic for a book known for its color symbolism and …

Bold-Riley-Front

Confessions of a Comics Shop Junkie, No. 83

Here we go again with Confessions of a Comics Shop Junkie, in which I opine on various recently released publications of the sequential graphic nature, some of which may be sitting on the rack at a comics shop, or awaiting the click of a button on some online merchant’s web page, near you. If you’re lucky. Or not, as the case may be. BANDETTE Script: Paul Tobin; Art: Colleen Coover THE OCTOBER GIRL Script/Art: Matthew Dow Smith Monkeybrain Comics, downloadable for .99¢ per issue New comics efforts from a brand new collective of sorts called “Monkeybrain Comics“, a digital-only enterprise that assembles many worthy creators at a reasonable price, doing comics of the type that the Big Two are reluctant to publish. A forward looking endeavor, for sure, and one would hope that by offering high-quality stories (another series, unread by me, is written by iZombie and self-exiled former DC scripter Chris Roberson) at a reasonable price, they would/should do quite well. The jury’s still out on that, but aesthetics-wise, at least, I think the new …

Confessions of a Comics Shop Junkie, No. 71

Ah me, the hurrier I go the behinder I get, as the saying goes. Welcome back to another tardy edition of Confessions, in which I opine on various recently released publications of the sequential graphic nature, some of which may be sitting on the rack at a comics shop, or awaiting the click of a button on some online merchant’s web page, near you. If you’re lucky. Or not, as the case may be. THE LEAGUE OF EXTRAORDINARY GENTLEMEN: CENTURY: 1969 Script: Alan Moore, Art: Kevin O’Neill Top Shelf, $9.95 At first I thought that Alan Moore had dusted off an old Promethea story and changed the principals to suit his needs; I suppose it’s not quite that, but it’s awfully darn close. Mr. Moore certainly does seem to feel the need to go to his arcane magick well quite often; at least here it’s in the service of…well, if not satire, at perhaps homage though I can’t imagine Moore revering anything but himself. Anyway, and I’m assuming you’re all at least superficially aware of the basic …

The Most Disturbing Halloween EVER!: John Cale

That’s right, folks, the most disturbing Halloween EVER! From now until Halloween, the Popdose staff are going to be thumbing through their record collections in search of the music that gives them the worst case of the heebie-jeebies. In this installment, Jack Feerick looks back at a John Cale album from 1982. —Anthony Hansen I came to John Cale by way of Alan Moore. That sounds pretty roundabout, but I figure it’s not uncommon. See, Moore used a (misquoted and misattributed) Cale line as the epigram for the mind-blowing final chapter of Watchmen, and Watchmen has probably sold more copies over the years than any John Cale record has, ever. So there must be other poor souls out there who closed the book on that final panel — impossibly stark, just white text on black with the icon of a clock, hands pointing to midnight — and then flipped back to the indicia to find the source of the quote. It would be a stronger world, a stronger loving world to die in. Because, you …

DVD Review: “The Mindscape of Alan Moore”

As the film adaptation of the seminal graphic novel Watchmen hangs on at movie theaters — it hasn’t exactly lived up to box-office expectations — a lot of questions have popped up about Alan Moore, the book’s writer. He’s refused to allow his name to be associated with the film, hence the “co-created by” credit that only lists the book’s artist, Dave Gibbons; Moore has even insisted that all of his royalties from the film be given to Gibbons. So who is this enigmatic Englishman? How does he come up with his ideas? What do his colleagues think of him? How does he work? It was with these questions that I eagerly sat down to watch DeZ Vylenz’s The Mindscape of Alan Moore, a 2006 documentary about the author that came out on DVD last year in a two-disc set. The bulk of the movie consists of Moore talking directly to the camera from, I presume, his home in England. Dressed in black, with snake and skull rings covering his fingers, and surrounded by stacks …

Film Review: “Watchmen”

Thanks to last year’s Iron Man and Dark Knight, the age of the superhero as a legitimate and viable tale in the realm of cinema is now in full effect. The epic story of Watchmen continues the trend of anchoring such heroes in an entirely believable world. This world isn’t exactly ours, however. Based on the 1986 best-selling graphic novel by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons (both this book and Frank Miller’s “The Dark Knight Returns” helped raise storytelling for comics to the adult level and set in motion changes within the industry that are still felt today), the tale is set in an alternate 1985, where superheroes were once a part of everyday life–helping to win the Vietnam War and get Nixon elected to three terms in office–but have since been outlawed by the government. Most have retired, but a few, such as the enigmatic Rorschach (Jackie Earle Haley) continue to operate, while others such as the Comedian (Jeffrey Dean Morgan) and Dr. Manhattan (Billy Crudup)–the only living being with actual superpowers–live and work …

Basement Songs: Pink Floyd, “On the Turning Away”

Through the eyes of my son, I’ve been reliving a part of my youth in the form of colorful costumed super heroes from cartoons and the pages of comic books. Because Jacob’s sister, Sophie, and his mom have no enthusiasm whatsoever for this stuff, he and I get to bond over the muscle bound humans out to save the world. With equal parts fascination and wonder, the two of us leaf through my musty old comics from the ‘80s and the glossy new ones we buy once a month. My personal interest began as a child, around Jacob’s age, when my parents bought me the oversized graphic novel Superman vs. Wonder Woman. From that point on, I was obsessed with all of the big guns, like Spider-Man, Daredevil, and Green Arrow. But my favorite adventures always involved a group of outcasts, teens mostly: The Uncanny X-Men. In my teens, most of my X-Men comics were bought in a Convenient Food Mart located next door to the small music studio where I took drum lessons. In …