All posts tagged: Bette Midler

Colbert

Why Stephen Colbert’s “We’ll Meet Again” Singalong Was the Greatest Send-Off in TV History

It’s been half a day since Stephen Colbert ended The Colbert Report and the way it went out is still circulating in my head. Not even today’s Mellowmas installment could purge it. And that’s a good thing, because, Christ, that was awful. I didn’t really have an idea of what special stunt Colbert would do to say goodbye, but I was positive┬áthat Jon Stewart would be involved in some capacity. And when Colbert started to sing “We’ll Meet Again” with Stewart walking on midway through the first verse, I nearly lost it. But I don’t think anybody was prepared for what came next. Dozens of celebrities who had been on the show over the years then popped up in groups to sing along, accompanied only by Randy Newman’s piano. With every new crop, you recalled their appearances over the years, from frequent guests like Neil Degrasse Tyson and Doris Kearns Goodwin to D.C. Representative Eleanor Holmes Norton to that time when Gloria Steinem did a cooking segment with Jane Fonda. The sheer number of guests …

Barbara Hershey and Bette Midler in "Beaches" (Walt Disney Pictures)

World’s Worst Songs: “Wind Beneath My Wings”

“Wind Beneath My Wings” expresses a lovely sentiment: “you’re my hero, you’re everything I would like to be, whatever I am capable of doing is because of you.” If anyone ever said that to me, I’d be moved beyond measure. Unless they said it by dedicating that damn song on the radio. Almost everybody who sings it does it at a lugubrious dirge-like tempo. If you really love me, you won’t bore me to death. The song dates back to 1981, when Roger Whittaker recorded it. It first hit the charts in 1983 in a version by Lou Rawls. He was pretty much incapable of doing anything uncool, but skated dangerously close by speaking the first verse rather than singing it, only to redeem that decision by giving the rest of it his trademark swing. It’s the best version of the song, and the other big ones aren’t close. Gladys Knight and the Pips cut it that year too, under the title “Hero.” The artist who made the biggest splash with the song in 1983 …

Bottom Feeders: The Ass End of the ’80s, Part 59

I’m going to issue you a promise — I promise to never Rickroll you again (in this series). I mean, there’s no way I could top last week’s shenanigans anyway. As a reminder to those who are just tuning in, I only leave each week’s songs up until the next week’s entry is posted. After that you’re out of luck. But as a special treat, I’m going to leave “American Memories” posted for a second week. For those who still haven’t located it, go to the very bottom of last week’s post and look for “an extra song.” Sorry, I don’t take requests, so you’ve got one more week to pick it up. As far as this week goes, M’s been such a mixed bag so far — we’ve seen some really good artists and heard a lot of rare songs, but this week we visit one of my least favorite artists of the decade. Way to kill my momentum, M! There’s a whopping 23 songs in this post. Enjoy all but the last six …