All posts tagged: Broadway

Snider

Earmageddon: Deemageddon!

Jeff Giles is a fucking asshole. I know I’ve said that before. And I’ll say it again, partly because it’s fun, but mostly because it’s true. Here’s why: Longtime readers will note that we have somewhat of a code here at Popdose. It says that, if someone gives you a gift of music, the least you can do is listen to it once, regardless of quality. This code was created by, wait for it, Jeff “Fucking Asshole” Giles. And that’s the joy of Earmaggedon — torturing your close friends with the gift of music. So after Jeff nearly caused me to rethink my position on capital punishment with Rappy McRapperson’s Live at Amway Arena, I sent him opera singer Cathy Berberian’s misguided attempt to turn Beatles songs into arias. That was in March 2012 and he still has not listened. Every time I’d bring it up, he’d gripe about being too busy with work or family commitments or home improvement projects and that he’d try to get to it when he can. Berberian’s album is 35 minutes long. …

guysanddolls92_pb

You’re Dead to Us…Broadway Musicals As an Important Cultural Force

A series in which we look at once common curiosities of pop culture that don’t exist anymore, be it because of changing tastes, the fragmentation of culture, or merely the fickle nature of fads. The Great White Way. The Boards. Ol’ Stagey. Sondheim’s Grand Temple. Gershwin Alley. The Street Made of Songs and Dreams and Songs. These are among the many nicknames for Broadway with which, as an average American in the middle of the 20th century, you would be familiar. Except for the ones I just made up of course, but you probably wouldn’t even know that, because who cares about the day-to-day of Broadway except for those intolerable kids in high school who were obsessed with Rent? But a few decades ago, you, average American, would have known and loved “Some Enchanted Evening,” “You’re the Top,” and “You’ll Never Walk Alone,” and also known that they came from South Pacific, Anything Goes, and Carousel. The plays, but more so, the musicals of Broadway, up until the 1970s or so, were a major influence and …

"Hair" has never been off the stage very long since 1968; a new revival will tour the country in 2013. This artwork was used to advertise the 2009 revival.

The #1 Albums: “Hair”

The changing mores of the 1960s eventually reached far beyond popular music. Motion pictures abandoned the production codes that had ruled since the 1930s and for the first time, the violence and sexuality of the real world could be shown on screen. Television slowly broadened its definition of acceptable content, and as it did, it abandoned western- and rural-themed shows in favor of programs with a hipper, urban outlook. Even Broadway got an infusion of the counterculture, thanks to the musical Hair. The so-called “American tribal love-rock musical” opened on Broadway in April 1968 to critical raves and commercial success, despite containing envelope-pushing nudity and open sexuality, drug use, and songs that made fun of religion and patriotism. Hair was even nominated for the Best Musical Tony Award. After its Broadway success, Hair hit the road—and the shit hit the fan. Changing mores or not, the show’s content offended many. Some performances were picketed, some theaters refused to book the show, and some were threatened with closure if they did. A theater in Cleveland was …

"Ghost," the Musical

Popdose Roundtable: A Musical “Ghost” Haunts Broadway

There was no immediate warning about whether audience members in the first five rows might be spattered with stray bits of clay, but on Monday the producers of the musical version of “Ghost,” the supernatural romance that showed us how the living and the dead could collaborate around a pottery wheel, said it will come to Broadway in the spring. Dw. Dunphy: Hit me back when we get to Porky’s: The Musical. Jeff Giles: You know, I think that would be kind of fun. Mike Duquette: Maybe I haven’t watched it in awhile, but I recall Ghost having some pretty ridiculous, sudden moments of violence that seemed tonally incorrect for your run-of-the-mill tearjerker romance. I can only imagine how they’ll adapt dudes getting hit by trucks and impaled by broken windows for the stage. Matt Springer: When they get to the big “Unchained Melody” moment, they should know Bill Medley is VERY MUCH AVAILABLE, according to Wikipedia… “Bill Medley currently performs at Dick Clark’s American Bandstand Theater in Branson, Missouri.” He’d probably walk out and …