All posts tagged: Dolly Parton

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Like, Omigod! Digging Through the ’80s Pop Culture Box, Part 3

Still on Disc One of this compilation, and get a load of this line-up! This may, in fact, be the single Mellow Gold-iest article we’ve ever done or will ever do on Popdose. #11 Air Supply, “Lost In Love” (1980) #3 in the Hot 100, #1 Adult Contemporary. Chris Holmes – I was fairly oblivious to the whole Air Supply phenomenon, although I think my mom had one of their cassettes. Something with a hot air balloon on it perhaps? Anyway, I guess this is a great song for someone who heard “I’m Not in Love” and thought, “You know, I really did like that 10cc song but it was just a bit too intense.” Jack Feerick – The opening acoustic guitar briefly threatens something elegant and folky. No such luck. What “Lost In Love” does demonstrate, though, is how much country-and-western is in Air Supply’s musical DNA. That loping rhythm, the pinpoint bass, the occasional overplaying of bored sessionmen, the overload of keyboard fairy-dust — all of it, straight outta Nashville, for better and …

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You’re Dead to Us…Hit Songs By Older Adults, Made for Older Adults

A new series in which we look at once common curiosities of pop culture that don’t exist anymore, be it because of changing tastes, the fragmentation of culture, or merely the fickle nature of fads. My first memories of pop music are around 1981, 1982, age three or so. That dovetailed with the time my parents’ reached that point that most parents reach—when they stop actively paying attention to and keeping up with current pop music. Thus, American pop music began with “Islands in the Stream” and “Hard to Say I’m Sorry” for me, and ended with “Islands in the Stream” and “Hard to Say I’m Sorry” for my parents. Since then it’s been nothing but The Big Chill soundtrack and church music. This conscious shift into ignorance or semi-ignorance of current chart hits has happened to me, too. I’ve got a kid and a job and a novel I’m never going to finish to tackle, so there’s less time for music. Every day for a few hours while I work I take some time to listen …

CHART ATTACK!: 2/14/81

Howdy, everybody!  Happy Friday and welcome back to another edition of CHART ATTACK! This week’s mix is relatively eclectic, yet — as was often the case in the early ’80s — completely inoffensive.  And you’ll find references to John Lennon in four of this week’s singles.  On with the chart — let’s look at February 14, 1981! 10. Hey Nineteen — Steely Dan Amazon iTunes 9. Givin’ it Up for Your Love — Delbert McClinton Amazon iTunes 8. Keep On Loving You — REO Speedwagon Amazon iTunes 7. (Just Like) Starting Over — John Lennon Amazon iTunes 6. Woman — John Lennon Amazon iTunes 5. Passion — Rod Stewart Amazon iTunes 4. The Tide is High — Blondie Amazon iTunes 3. I Love a Rainy Night — Eddie Rabbitt Amazon iTunes 2. 9 to 5 — Dolly Parton Amazon iTunes 1. Celebration — Kool & the Gang Amazon iTunes 10. Hey Nineteen — Steely Dan (download) I love Steely Dan.  And I love “Hey Nineteen.”  And although I’ve never had any misconception about this song’s …

CD Review: Steve Martin, “The Crow: New Songs for the Five-String Banjo”

If, upon hearing the news that Steve Martin has a banjo album, you have an image of Martin in overalls and a straw hat displaying a novice’s banjo-picking skills while singing about shit and Shinola, you’re not alone. (Conversely, if you have an image of Martin in a suit with an arrow through his head, playing the banjo and singing about grandma, you’re not alone either.) The joke’s on us, however, because Martin’s appreciation for and mastery of the banjo is deeper than anyone but the most devoted fan might anticipate. Martin originally picked up the banjo to add another talent to his one-man show, and over time added satirical banjo songs. His comedic career took off, but he never set the banjo down. In 2001, he played with Earl Scruggs on the tune “Foggy Mountain Breakdown,” for the album Earl Scruggs and Friends, which won him a Grammy for Best Country Instrumental Performance the following year. In 2007 he played his own tune, “The Crow,” with Tony Trischka on Trischka’s album Double Banjo Bluegrass …

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How Bad Can It Be?: “The Hee Haw Collection”

I’m always amazed by the crap that people hold onto. I have a lot of enthusiasms — music, comics, film — but I’ve never had the urge to be a completist about any of it. Every year or so, I sort through the stuff I’ve accumulated and put together a big box of books I know I’ll never re-read and DVDs I’m unlikely to re-watch, and off they go to the Salvation Army. And I don’t buy that many books and videos to begin with; I already invested most of my 1990s Fridays in watching The X-Files — why would I want to watch it again on DVD? Which is a roundabout way of saying that I started this project baffled as to how anybody might think that Hee Haw was worth preserving for the ages. But sure enough, the good folks at Time-Life Video have an extensive collection of episodes for sale. Now, admittedly, I’m not the target audience here. I grew up in New England, which was for a long time the one …

CD Review: Frank Sinatra, “From the Heart”

Frank Sinatra – From the Heart (2009, Legacy) purchase this album (Amazon) Valentine’s Day – depending on your walk of life, it’s either a splendid day of warm, romantic thoughts and a gimme so far as “gettin’ some tonight,” or it’s a Hallmark sham of an institution to remind us that all our friends are happily married and having kids, but we’re about to dip our Doritos into another vat of guacamole all alone. Since I’m flying solo this year, guess who’s fattening up on avocado? You don’t have to be a heartless cynic to see the strings attached to this high holiday of chocolate-covered, heart-shaped, red crepe emotion. Take, for instance, Sony Legacy’s From The Heart collection. Eight CDs cut and pasted together to capitalize celebrate the spirit of l’amour, all representing a different demographic: Billie Holliday and Miles Davis if you love it jazzy, Babyface if you love it smooth and sensitive, The Isley Brothers if you don’t mind a little rugburn with your affection, Dolly Parton if you like doin’ the nasty …

The Fifteenth Day of Mellowmas: Dollytoe!

Last year, on the Fifteenth Day of Mellowmas, we tortured ourselves by listening to Kenny Rogers and Dolly Parton sing “I Believe in Santa Claus.” So what better way to celebrate the anniversary of that horrible day by listening to another track from the same album? Kenny Rogers and Dolly Parton — A Christmas to Remember (download) From Once Upon a Christmas Amazon iTunes Jason: Oh man Jeff: Now THIS is Mellowmas. Jason: I can’t believe we’re dipping in the Kenny and Dolly well again. After last year’s torturous “I Believe in Santa Claus.” Jeff: It’s a deep well, Jason. Jason: Oooh! Opening with the chorus! Nice choice! Jeff: Here come those harmonies! What a Christmas to remember! I wonder what made it so memorable? Let’s find out. Jason: Oh, so synthesized. So very, very synthesized. Jeff: Dolly was fantasizing about a fast-talking lover, but…Kenny made it a Christmas to…oh, God. Jason: I have no idea what happened in the first verse. I wasn’t listening. But apparently whatever happened made it a Christmas to remember. …

Into the Ear of Madness: Week 9 — Bill, Dolly & Alice

Over the next year Terje Fjelde has agreed to listen to nothing but David Foster on his iPod. He’s loaded the thing with over 1,200 songs produced, arranged, composed, and/or played by David Foster. A deal with the devil? He keeps wondering. Are you bored? What can I say? My David Foster experience is a breeze. It’s fun. It’s educational. My posts so far are almost snark-free, I’m turning into a blind-eyed David Foster apologist a la the loyal hordes of Trent Reznor. Is this real, or is it a subliminal reaction to my unsound David Foster exposure? It’s too early to tell for sure, but you can rest assured I’ll be keeping a close eye on my condition, and keep you updated on any sign of mental decay. Dolly Parton – “Here You Come Again,” from Here You Come Again (1977) David Foster collaborated with Dolly Parton on several occasions, but this was probably their most important encounter. You may even say that a little bit of pop music history was made during the …

Chartburn: 3/28/08

Mainstream Rock: Lenny Kravitz, “Are You Gonna Go My Way” (1993) Zack: I remember when Lenny Kravitz was first thrust upon the music world by a few cynical record company executives. It seemed like he had been designed by a committee to take advantage of all the latest pop-culture trends. Dreadlocks were in, so they gave him dreads. Tattoos and nose rings were still edgy and cool, so those were included. It was like watching a rock-star version of Poochie. One of the talking points that was pushed was that he was a talented songwriter, and every time I heard that spewing from the mouth of some idiot VJ I felt like I’d been taking crazy pills. Some sample lyrics from Lenny’s quill: We’ve got to hug and rub-a-dub We got to dance and be in love Based on his biography, Lenny doesn’t sound like such a bad guy, and this is actually a well-produced video, but I hate hate hate the song. Robert: I shouldn’t hate Lenny because …