All posts tagged: Faith No More

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Review: Faith No More – “Sol Invictus”

Faith No More, after an 18-year recorded absence, is back today with a new CD, Sol Invictus, and the band sounds as finely tuned and ferocious as ever, even if the act of reuniting for a formal recording after a few years on the touring circuit brings with it some thornier issues. The record, clocking in at 39 minutes, is tightly wound and resilient, seemingly the work of younger men. When vocalist/carnival-barker Mike Patton croons “lee–ee–ader of men” over multiple iterations of himself on “Superhero,” an album-opener after the mood-setting title track, you get a sense of how carefully and methodically this thing was recorded. Or, second example, when the band echoes its “Easy” cover roots on the loungish “Sunny Side Up.” Or, third example, when a nearly unrecognizable Patton deadpans and deliciously cusses on the Record Store Day special “Motherfucker.” Or, fourth example, one of the record’s best tracks, the angular and throttling “Matador,” where Patton roars about the killing floor – whew, chills. Anyway, come to think of it, this whole thing is pretty damn …

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REVIEW: tētēma – “Geocidal”

Sabina Maselli’s spirited avant-film experimentation is the perfect introduction to tētēma, the Anthony Pateras/Mike Patton duo debuting tomorrow on Ipecac. Both, it should be noted, are mind-blowing. Filmed in digital, transferred to film and bounced back again into the digital domain – just like Beckett wrote/translated from French to English to French again, Pateras notes – Maselli’s video for the single “Tenz” is a distorted tableau of the human body and the landscape it inhabits. We see rhythmically edited, rapid-fire images of opened and closed lime-green eyes, hands and feets in stark lighting, everything captured in the midst of a black hole, a colored pattern or the blurred light of a projector. Alcoholics Anonymous participants worship an alternately blank-screened or flickering TV, desolate trees pass us by, and people lay incapacitated on stage floors while Patton croons, “Even when immobile/ We are in motion.” Nervy, to say the least. And the music matches, a wondrous cacophony of ambient pastiche that seems to sit somewhere among aggressive, apocalyptic trip-hop, Patton’s pop-constructions with Peeping Tom, John Zorn-ish jazz …

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ALBUM REVIEW: Hepa-Titus – “Gettin’ It On”

Ipecac Records devotees might be led, for good reason, to believe that the Kevin Rutmanis narrative had come to a close. Just don’t tell that to Rutmanis. Let’s catch up for the newbies. Rutmanis, a founding member of The Cows, was enlisted by King Buzzo and Dale Crover to play bass in the most recent full-time three-man line-up of The Melvins around the time they jumped to Ipecac Records in the late 90s, before parting ways with the group about, jeez, nine years ago. Around the same time, Rutmanis also split with Tomahawk, the uber-supergroup featuring Mike Patton of Faith No More and Mr. Bungle, Duane Denison of The Jesus Lizard and John Stanier of Helmet and Battles. Silence. So much for that. Rutmanis, in all his strange glory, then randomly popped up in the recently released Qui video, this one for “I Definitely Love You,” twitching and generally exuding an air of sexual battery toward the band’s cross-dressing members. Sometimes-Qui-frontman David Yow also appeared, adding to the tension, and, of course, there was the …

Los Lobos - photo credit: Drew Reynolds

The Popdose Interview: Steve Berlin of Los Lobos

As music fans, bands find their way into our song-obsessed hearts in a variety of ways and some of the best experiences come about very unexpectedly. I think we all have those early albums that we remember hearing that were different. They were different, because top to bottom, the listening experience provided a sonic knockout because of the quality of the songs and in some cases, where the band took those songs. Kiko by Los Lobos hit the mark on both of those points. Spanning 16 tracks, it was a remarkably filler-free listen that found the band reaching new creative peaks throughout. Los Lobos were extremely inspired during the recording sessions for Kiko and that comes through in the vibe of the songs which made it to our ears in album form. And yet, it wasn’t an easy time for the band. They began the sessions for what would become Kiko surrounded by feelings of frustration. The creation of their previous album The Neighborhood had been somewhat of a soul sucking experience on many levels …

Friday Night Videos!: The Hits of 1990

If you’re holding your breath for the day MTV starts playing music videos again, let it go. It’s never going to happen, not ever. No, never, no way, no how. But who needs MTV in the digital age? We’re here, the time’s right, and the videos are waiting for us. This week’s list was democratically determined by the Popdose Staff. The terms were simple. The songs that get the most votes get the spots, except for the #1 of the year. So set the way-way-back machine for 1990, get rid of those stupid shoulder pads, leave the schmutz in your hair ’cause it’s cheaper than gel and start wondering about whether flannel will be the next big trend. It’s time to rock. Depeche Mode – Enjoy The Silence: Yes, I know. Twin Towers. It’s hard to avoid ’em in this video, but I ask that our readers merely pretend Depeche Mode is standing on Spinal Tap’s miniature  Stonehenge. That won’t make it any less creepy, but creepy in a whole other way. Aerosmith – Janie’s …

The Friday Mixtape: 6/26/09

Don’t just do something — stand there! Ben Folds Five – Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head from Burt Bacharach: One Amazing Night (1998) Big Star – When My Baby’s Beside Me from #1 Record (1972) Blue Magic – Sideshow from The Best of Blue Magic: Soulful Spell (1974) Boo-Yaa T.R.I.B.E. and Faith No More – Another Body Murdered from Judgment Night soundtrack (1993) Cat Power – Wonderwall (Saboteur Version) — unreleased (2000) Dido – Slide from No Angel (1999) Lene Lovich – Lucky Number from Stateless (1978) Radio Birdman – Do the Pop from Radios Appear (1977) Screamin’ Jay Hawkins – Constipation Blues from Greatest Hits (1969) Sevendust – Waffle from Home (1999) Soul Coughing – Circles from El Oso (1998) The Moody Blues – 22,000 Days from Long Distance Voyager (1981) Ween – Push th’ Little Daisies from Pure Guava (1992) Wilco – Burned from I Shot Andy Warhol soundtrack (1996)

Dw. Dunphy On… Faith No More

The “My Album / Your Album” dynamic. Sounds like a really odd phrase, but you’ve experienced it: You are suddenly enthralled by this artist or band, you’ve listened to their debut a million times, memorized every word and note and have contributed to their sudden overnight success. Now their sophomore album is being released! You run breathlessly to the store or the computer and grab it up! You listen to it and wait for those waves of satisfaction to wash over you. You listen. You listen. You say… What the hell is this?! The old saying is that a band has a lifetime to make their first recording and a year to make the second, so that’s where the “sophomore slump” comes into play. That’s partially true. The other part is that a debut album is in some ways a calculated effort to curry the favor of an audience. It does everything right so far as the industry is concerned, and an artist’s weirder, more fringe tendencies get glossed back with harmonies and reverb. Ah, …

Hooks ‘N’ You: Random Reminiscing From the Averett Years

I can say without hesitation that today’s Hooks ‘N’ You was written more quickly and with less forethought in the history of the column, but whether that’s a good thing or a bad thing is a judgment call that only you can make. I guess we’ll find out soon enough, eh? Earlier this morning, I posted some photos on Facebook from my college days at the school which is now known as Averett University. (It used to simply be Averett College, but it’s clearly much cooler now than it was when I attended.) The majority of the shots are of the various folks who haunted the halls of Bottom Bishop, where I made my home from 1990 – 1992, but the series begins with four photos of my dorm room. When I arrived in Danville, VA, I had just spent a year working music retail for Record Bar, so I had more posters to put on my walls than I had available wall space…but believe you me, I took advantage of the opportunity to plaster …