All posts tagged: Genesis

Collins

The Very Guest of…Phil Collins

There are two kinds of people in this world: those that say Phil Collins is a doughy, ineffectual frontman who ruined the prog-rock outfit Genesis (and then his own concurrent solo career) by introducing the broadest pop music ideas into their sound, and those who wish the first group would take a hike and acknowledge Collins – solo or in part of a group – as an underrated genius. The mealy-mouthed damnations of Collins as MOR demigod betray the fact that Collins could beat the hell out of a drum kit unlike anyone else and had a much more varied musical palate than anyone cares to admit, from some dizzying rhythms on early Brian Eno LPs (Taking Tiger Mountain (by Strategy) and Another Green World) to the fusion of Brand X. In honor of the man’s 62nd birthday, here’s a look back at eight of his best guest spots from the 1980s. In a time where you just could not get tunes like “In the Air Tonight,” “Sussudio” and “Invisible Touch” off the airwaves, it’s worth reconsidering these …

Friday Night Videos!: The Hits of 1987

If you’re holding your breath for the day MTV starts playing music videos, let it go. It’s never going to happen, not while there’s still a Crib left to plunder, Mr. Yo. But who needs MTV in the digital age? We’re here, the time’s right, and the videos are waiting for us. So set the way-way-back machine for 1987, strap on your shoulder pads, poof up that hair and layer those jackets. It’s time to rock. Bruce Willis – Respect Yourself: How in the world could this song be the subject of this video sung by this person and still be “Respect Yourself?” Expose – Let Me Be The One: 1987 was the year of the glamorous female singer/group. That’s about all I’ve got in regard to this video. Bon Jovi – Wanted Dead Or Alive: Kids, take a look at this hair and understand why our current cancer rates have skyrocketed. I’m not saying you should blame Bon Jovi. I’m not saying you shouldn’t. Just take a good suck off your oxygen tank before …

Bottom Feeders: The Rock End of the ’80s, Part 19

The 19th week brings us the start of the 7th letter of the alphabet. Just a few artists here, but some killer songs as we continue to look at the songs that hit the Billboard rock charts in the ’80s but failed to cross over into the Hot 100. Peter Gabriel “Kiss of Life” 1982, #34 (download) “I Have the Touch” 1982, #46 (download) “I Go Swimming (Live)” 1983, #38 (download) “Red Rain” 1986, #3 (download) “That Voice Again” 1986, #14 (download) “Kiss of Life” and “I Have the Touch” are both from Peter’s fourth self-titled album also released as Security in US. It’s probably the weakest of his albums until 2002’s Up though it’s still pretty damn fine. “Shock the Monkey” and “The Rhythm of the Heat” are much better than these two however. “I Go Swimming” is from the Plays Live album in 1983 and is really unlike the Peter Gabriel you know. He performed it live as early as 1980 and I swear there’s a studio version that’s either on a soundtrack …

Mix Six: “This and That”

DOWNLOAD THE FULL MIX HERE This week’s mix started out like a lot of mixes:  one or two songs getting stuck in my head and me trying to fit the pieces together for a complete mix.  Since I’ve done a couple of mixes called “Random Sample,” I couldn’t very well title this mix “Another Another Random Sample,” because that’s redundant and stupid. So I opted for an even more inane title, “This and That.”  But it does fit since my whole modus operandi — which went something like:  “I think this song would go well with that one.” Pretty silly, huh. However, the songs I’ve chosen aren’t at all silly – or at least I hope you don’t think so. “Back in N.Y.C.,” Genesis (Download) Clearly, when Dw Dunphy and I were doing our hair and make-up the other day, neither of us mentioned that we were both on a The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway kick.  He featured this album on his “50Prog50: The Best Prog Albums, Part One” and I’m doing the same on …

Ticket Stub: Genesis in Los Angeles, January ’75

A week ago this past Monday, prog kids around the world got their wish when Genesis was finally inducted into The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. The list of artists that are not in the Hall stretches for miles and miles, with many kept out as a result of politics and critical disdain for their music. Among those on the list, Genesis have been a group that brought up in conversations past, would often provoke a surprised reaction, upon learning that they were not already among the bands/artists inducted. But what does it really mean as an artist to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame? I suppose it gives you a little bit of prestige, but what is that prestige worth in the long run? In the short term, perhaps a small bump in record sales. Who cares, right? And perhaps that is why many of the artists that are currently among the snubbed could care less.  They’re going to continue to make money from catalog royalties and touring – …

Mix Six: “The Remake”

DOWNLOAD THE FULL MIX HERE What possesses an artist to revisit his or her recordings years later and decide to remake the song?  Sometimes it’s money, sometimes it’s about a label being a big butt-head, and sometimes it’s just about revisiting a song to see what new wine can be wrought out of old wine skins.  Whatever the case, this week I’m going lay on you the good, the bad, and the ugly of remakes.  Oh sure, some of these don’t even sound like remakes at all, and others you may wonder: “Why the hell did they do that?”  But one thing’s for sure, you’ll probably be scrambling to hear the originals – just for comparison’s sake if nothing else. Okay, let’s get it started, shall we? “Lady ’95,” Styx (Download) Now here’s a case of a label being a big butt-head about a song the band wanted feature on a compilation album  The Styx corporation reunited in 1995 to put together a greatest hits collection to, well, make some money, and when assembling their …

DVD Review: “Mellodrama”

In 1978, a band I was working with was recording an album at A & R Studios in New York City. In the studio was the keyboard called a Mellotron. We never did use it on the album, but I liked to hit the key that made a dog bark because it sounded just like the dog barking at the end of “Caroline No” from Pet Sounds. I was pretty sure that the thing could do more than that, but I didn’t know how to use it, and I didn’t know anything about the years of innovation that led to my smile when I heard that dog bark. Now, thanks to the new documentary being released today, cleverly titled Mellodrama, at least I’m clued in to the instrument’s history. I know how a military electronics technician by the name of Harry Chamberlin built and marketed a keyboard that bore his name back in 1948. I know that he used members of the Lawrence Welk orchestra to record the eight second tape snippets that the machine …

Bootleg City: Peter Gabriel in Philadelphia, July ’87

OK, I have to tell you a story. The other day I was sleeping off my annual four-day Thanksgiving bender when my phone rang at the crack of midnight. It took me a second to figure out that the woman with the strange accent on the other end of the line was asking if I would accept charges from a Mayor Cass. I said “Sure,” but I was a little apprehensive, because anytime you have to accept charges at midnight, well, you have a problem. I heard a few clicks, then a loud voice said, “Duuuuuude, I got your Spectrum hanging,” followed by peals of braying laughter that quickly disintegrated into a coughing spree. “Oh, shit,” I thought. The mayor obviously didn’t take my advice about avoiding the cocktails with the little umbrellas in them. While I was waiting for him to continue, I heard the obvious melody of “Have a Holly Jolly Christmas” being played on kettle drums. I also heard a voice that sounded like the woman who kept saying “Bienvenido à Miami” …