All posts tagged: Heart

Player1970s

The Popdose Interview: Peter Beckett of Player

Remember the band Player? Sure you do…and even if you think you don’t, it’ll only take three words to remind you who they are: “Baby Come Back.” That’s not by any means to suggest that there’s no more to the band than their biggest hit, mind you: they released four albums during their original run during the late ’70s and early ’80s, and despite regular claims to the contrary by the misinformed, they actually had two – count ’em – TWO top-10 hits (the other being “This Time I’m In It For Love”), and although the band’s line-up has fluctuated over the years, Player continues to reform on occasion for live dates and, believe it or not, even has a new album: Too Many Reasons, released on Frontiers Records. Popdose was fortunate enough to chat with frontman Peter Beckett about the band’s reemergence, along with a deep discussion of his past musical endeavors, including stories about opening for Jimi Hendrix and The Who, co-writing an Olivia Newton-John classic, and more. Popdose: You and Ronn Moss …

Rush

Rush, Donna Summer, Heart, P.E. & More: Meet The Rock Hall Class of 2013

Imagine a year when the Rock ‘n Roll Hall of Fame nominees are announced and everyone shut up? Well, that’ll never happen, but most people seem fairly cool with this year’s inducted artists, who were announced by Flea of the Red Hot Chili Peppers at a press conference yesterday. Let’s take a quick look at this year’s nominees-who will officially be inducted next spring. Albert King: One of two posthumous honorees (he died in ’92,) blues guitarist King didn’t have […]

Hey man, nice graphics. Seriously. Looks great.

World’s Worst Songs: Heart’s “All I Want to Do Is Make Love to You”

When people like me gripe about artists left out of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Heart is one of the first bands we mention. As the first superstar band fronted by women, their cultural significance is unquestioned, and they’ve sure sold a lot of records over a long period of time, which remains the chief criterion for enshrinement. (Apart from being on Jann Wenner’s personal A-list, the criteria for which remain hazy to everybody but Jann Wenner.) But Heart has released a fair amount of crap over the years. Even their legendary debut album, the 1976 release Dreamboat Annie, contains some embarrassingly bad moments alongside several inarguably classic songs. During the last half of the 80s, they scored several top-10 power ballads that blur in memory, as if they were the same song turned sideways and released again. And the 1990 iteration, “All I Want to Do Is Make Love to You” is one of the World’s Worst Songs. Give Ann and Nancy Wilson credit for telling a story in the song, which …

You Again?: Heart, “Red Velvet Car”

For the kids of my generation, Heart was just another source of power ballads — sort of a slightly more hairsprayed and corseted version of Starship or Chicago — and when their jig was up, right around the time 1994’s Desire Walks On came out, it was sort of sad (fewer corsets always are) but also something of a relief (who needs to hear “All I Wanna Do Is Make Love to You” again? Ever?) The truth of the matter, though, is that Heart was around long before “These Dreams” lit up the request lines; they were, in fact, one of the more entertaining (and groundbreaking) AOR acts of the ’70s. The Runaways received the biopic treatment this year, and they surely deserved it — but if the Runaways broke down the door for women with overdriven amps, Heart took that pungent, unstable fusion of rock & roll plus T&A and turned it into a reliable formula for minting platinum records. Between 1976 and 1980, the band sold more than seven million albums in the …

CD Review: Ian McLagan & the Bump Band, “Never Say Never”

I’m not much of a believer in band reunions — they seldom result in any output that actually improves the band’s legacy, and often have just the opposite effect. Still, I was thrilled recently when rumors of a Faces reunion were all over the Internet. First of all, the Faces were always one of my favorite bands; second, despite the presence of future superstars Rod Stewart and Ron Wood, they never really got the shot that they deserved. Of course, a lot of that was of their own mischievous making. In many ways the world has come to see the Faces as the perennial scrappy underdogs. Most of the Faces have gone on to solo careers, to one degree of success or another. Beloved bassist and songwriter Ronnie Lane died in 1997. None of them have been able to recreate the special vibe that a Faces album had, though; it was some sort of magic blend of carefree rock and roll, and cry in your beer pathos. Faces (and Small Faces) keyboard player Ian McLagan …

Bottom Feeders: The Ass End of the ’80s, Part 39

Last week in my intro I talked about De La Soul dropping their biggest hit song all the way down at track 20 on their debut album, 3 Feet High and Rising (1989), and that got the wheels rolling on another topic — album length. I don’t know if there’s ever been some defined rule as to how many songs it takes or how long an album needs to run to be considered an LP as opposed to an EP, but even if unspoken rules have existed, they’ve certainly changed over the years. I don’t know what the ’60s and ’70s were like, but for at least the first few years of the ’80s eight songs seemed to be the minimum amount needed for a legitimate LP. I’m assuming that’s because eight normal-length songs fit the best onto a record without it losing too much quality. Then maybe by the mid-’80s, as CDs were gaining in popularity, it climbed to ten average-length songs, though even in ’86 Peter Gabriel’s So had nine tracks on the …