All posts tagged: Jerry Goldsmith

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Boxed In: The Top Music Reissues of 2012

Every year, while lording over an impressive amount of music catalogue news and views at my site, The Second Disc, I think the same thing at the end of every year: this is it. This is the year the reissue/remaster/repackage trend gets too outsized for the marketplace. Once again, I am wrong. Are major and indie labels getting smarter and more ambitious about what to re-release and how to release it? Are aging hipsters and Gen-Xers, with their considerable gobs of disposable income, more apt to re-buy the same seminal albums they grew up with, plus a bonus disc of rarities and outtakes? Yes and yes – and yet, none of those are solely why catalogue music is more robust than ever. 2012 has seen a lot of catalogue titles that seem too big for the modern music business. Thanks to sites like U.K. blog SuperDeluxeEdition, value-added packaging and other flights of consumer fancy are more fetishized over now than when I first took serious notice of the trend. But what most deluxe packaging sometimes hides is …

smile-sessions

Popdose 2011: Mike Duquette’s Top Catalogue Projects

According to crazy people, next year will see the wholesale demise of compact discs as well as the heroic efforts of Jon Cusack saving the world from cataclysmic disaster. With that in mind, you’d think the year’s crop of reissues, box sets and other catalogue sets would be wildly disappointing. In fact, they managed to improve upon what wasn’t too shabby a year before. It felt like a week could not go by without reporting on some sort of vintage-oriented title, and with 2012 fast approaching, the time has come to tick off some of the best and the brightest – arranged in no order but alphabetically. The Beach Boys, The SMiLE Sessions (Capitol) It’s still hard to believe it’s legally possible to buy a set of material from The Beach Boys’ fabled unreleased album, the heartbreaking turning point for a band that should have had more years of transcendent pop music in them. Debate its merits as much as you want: at five CDs and a handful of vinyl, it’ll strike some as too comprehensive or too much like Brian Wilson’s completed …

Soundtrack Saturday: “Gremlins”

Here’s the thing — I love holiday-themed horror films. In fact, one of my favorite Christmas movies is the original Black Christmas (1974). You may think that makes me sick and twisted, but I’m really not; there’s just something about taking “the most wonderful time of the year” and adding blood and gore and evil that fascinates me. I think Gremlins (1984) may have been the starting point for my love of horror-filled holiday fare. It’s the embodiment of my reasons for loving Christmas-themed horror movies: the joyous and adorable turned into the frightening and demonic. Directed by Joe Dante, written by Chris Columbus, and executive-produced by Steven Spielberg, Gremlins begins with struggling inventor Rand Peltzer (Hoyt Axton) trying to sell his wares at a store in the Chinatown section of New York City. There he becomes enamored of a strange creature called a mogwai and decides it’ll be the perfect Christmas gift for his teenage son, Billy (Zach Galligan). He’s told at first by the store’s owner (Keye Luke) that the mogwai isn’t for …

Mix Six: “Super Soundtracks”

DOWNLOAD THE FULL MIX HERE Hiya, kids! This week’s mix is brought to you by Jeff Johnson, who’s been a friend of mine since high school. Ever since I’ve known him, Jeff’s tastes in music have skewed toward the soundtrack side, specifically orchestral soundtracks. We attended film school together (I changed majors at the end of my junior year), and he went on to write and direct a feature film called Holly vs. Hollywood. Nowadays Jeff is happily ensconced as the online store manager at the ever-popular soundtrack store (and record label) Intrada in Oakland, California. Intrada is one of those rare record stores where they not only exclusively stock movie soundtracks, they also restore and reissue them. Jeff also cohosts the podcast Filmed, Not Stirred with his gal pal Lisa. It’s unique because they review a new movie and compare it with an older movie in a similar genre or director. So you see? There is life after film school! —Ted You’re about to discover six pieces of music you’re not even really supposed …