All posts tagged: Joe Cocker

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Review: Jim O’Rourke – “Simple Songs”

Jim O’Rourke can resemble a complicated musical chameleon. Since the late 80s, he has blended a patchwork career in the avant-garde with explorations into cinema, post-, folk- and alt-rock, and membership with acoustic-chamber heroes Gastr del Sol and “punk” purveyors Sonic Youth. In his recent years, as he’s retired to Japan, he’s been more off than on. But he’s always been clear about his forays into POP. It’s candy. Or, more specifically, it’s an exercise purely of the simple, sensory variety. There is sometimes some cerebral urgency to it; you can here the way he toys with idol John Fahey’s tenets of rhythm and gradual expansion and repetition, like a sponge slowly growing in water with each passing tide, on “Women of the World,” off the excellent Eureka. But, more often than not, he is dressing the windows or, if cover art is any indication, inviting us to watch him pleasure himself. On Simple Songs, his first POP outing in a decade, available now on Drag City, he wastes little time reminding us of our …

Night Ranger

Spotify Playlist: Night Ranger Picks Their Favorite Tunes

Veteran rockers Night Ranger might be celebrating their 31st year as a band, but that doesn’t mean that they’re slowing things down one bit. The band just released their 11th studio album High Road on June 10 and they’ll be on the road playing shows around the globe for the rest of 2014. For some good road trippin’ music, we asked bassist/vocalist Jack Blades, drummer/vocalist Kelly Keagy and guitarist Brad Gillis to give us a Spotify playlist of some of their favorite songs and they were happy to oblige. They chose a rockin’ list of tunes with some of their favorite songs from their own catalog spiked in, including several songs from the new album. Enjoy the playlist and read the band’s comments on each song below! “White Room” – Cream Love the timpani in the intro. It is one of the most unusual sounding vocal tracks. One of the coolest ‘Wah Wah’ solos in the history of rock ‘n roll in the 2nd verse…”I’ll wait in the cue”….. love it! “Burn” – Deep Purple Glenn Hughes and …

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Suburban Metal Dad no. 168, “The Dance Recital, Part IV.”

Welcome to Suburban Metal Dad, Popdose’s new webcomic. It runs every Monday and Friday. Each edition of SMD features Sort-Of Soundtrack, an optional metal song that plays in a new window. Click for a bona fide blasphenomenon.  Click the pic to enlarge.  Have your ever seen kids dancing to a totally inappopriate song? Tell us in the comments section!

CD Review: Delaney & Bonnie, “On Tour With Eric Clapton” (Deluxe Edition)

By the time On Tour with Eric Clapton was released in 1970, the husband/wife pairing of Delaney and Bonnie Bramlett could loosely be placed in the category of “seasoned veterans” within the music industry, despite the fact that they had only been recording as a unit for a very short period of time. Delaney had come up in the business as a session musician, spending a very important period of time in the mid-’60s working as a member of the house band for the TV series Shindig!. Working on the television show would bring Bramlett in contact with Leon Russell (also a member of the Shindig! band) and Russell would play a very important role in Delaney’s musical future (and the pair also filtered into a potent scene of musicians featuring former Byrds members Gram Parsons and Chris Hillman that would eventually spawn The Flying Burrito Brothers). Bonnie Lynn O’Farrell was climbing her own ladder in the music industry, putting two notable notches onto her musical resume at a very early age, singing with blues …

Bottom Feeders: The Rock End of the ’80s, Part 10

This week we continue on with the letter C and visit some more tracks that hit the rock charts but never crossed over to the Billboard Hot 100 in the 1980s. Tom Cochrane & Red Rider “Lunatic Fringe” 1981, #11 (download) “Power (Strength In Numbers)” 1983, #13 (download) “Human Race” 1983, #11 (download) “Crack the Sky (Breakaway)” 1983, #39 (download) “Boy Inside the Man” 1986, #17 (download) “The Untouchable One” 1986, #48 (download) “Big League” 1988, #9 (download) “Calling America” 1989, #42 (download) I’m almost ashamed to say that the first time I heard Tom Cochrane is in 1992 with “Life is a Highway” – even more ashamed to say that I still think that album – Mad Mad World – is pretty damn awesome. But I was a dorky kid in the U.S. so I didn’t get much exposure to Canadian sensation Red Rider. What Mad Mad World did do however, is get me to go back and listen to the Red Rider catalog and while I didn’t find any albums that I thought …

DVD Review: “Woodstock: 3 Days of Peace and Music Director’s Cut”

There’s a well-known saying that if you think Woodstock was great, you weren’t there. The point is that the mud, drugs, lack of food and water, and often bad music made the whole thing a disaster for those who were there. I don’t know about where you live, but where I’m from in New Jersey, everyone of a certain age claims to have been there. I’ve even made that claim a couple of times. At least I was at the great, but now forgotten, Atlantic City Pop Festival two weeks earlier. If everyone who says they were there was actually there, there would have been millions of people rolling around in the mud, instead of the hundreds of thousands who were actually there. Jeff Giles reviewed the Blu-ray version of the new 40th Anniversary Edition Director’s Cut of the Woodstock film a couple of weeks ago. I haven’t read Jeff’s review because I make it a point not to read any reviews of something that I’m working on until after I’ve finished my review. So …

Popdose Flashback: Michael Bolton, “Soul Provider”

In Bull Durham, Kevin Costner’s character Crash Davis chides Nuke LaLoosh (Tim Robbins) for his laziness and lack of focus on the game of baseball. “You got a gift,” he says. “When you were a baby, the gods reached down and turned your right arm into a thunderbolt. You got a Hall-of-Fame arm, but you’re pissing it away.” Likewise, when Michael Bolotin (later, Bolton) was born, the gods reached down and gave him lungs of reech Coreenthian leather—a multi-octave range, filtered through a gruff, almost sandpaper-like delivery. But saying Bolton can sing is like saying George Bush can speak English: big deal, what’s he done with it? The issue is context. His early solo work in the 70s was crap—miscast as a Joe Cocker wannabe, he tried his hand crooning stuff like “These Eyes” and “Time is on My Side,” with no particular distinction. His two-album stint as the lead singer of Blackjack was similarly underwhelming—muddy production and faceless instrumentation (by Bruce Kulick, Sandy Gennaro, and Jimmy Haslip, all of whom would go on to …

Nine Hills in Seven Short Days: Joe Cocker @ The Nokia Theatre

For the least two years, the area in front of the Staples Center has been the site of a massive construction project, the behemoth “LA Live” complex. Costing approximately $2.5 billion, the complex is home to the Nokia Theatre, a venue that is described as “mid-size” (though it seats 7,100 people) and is scheduled to host the Emmy awards for at least the next ten years. Although I’ve got nothing against the music of Joe Cocker, aside from his seeming lack of original material, I wouldn’t consider myself a fan. Even so, I leapt at the chance to see him play at the Nokia; it’s been open for less than a year and I was very curious to see what it was like. I was suitably impressed. The design of the entire theater is very slick and modern, with translucent lobby walls that change color and concession menus that are featured on LCD television screens. On one hand, everything feels a bit corporate and seems like it will be dated in just a few short …

Bottom Feeders: The Ass End of the ’80s, Part 19

You know, there are times when even I’ve had enough of ’80s music. It’s hard to believe that since I’m still acquiring “new” music all the time, but sometimes I need something more. One of those times occurred this past Saturday as I was sitting at a poker table in Atlantic City, New Jersey. My iPod contains every Hot 100 hit from the ’80s plus many more ’80s tunes, some random great albums from the past two decades, and a ton of metal. I rarely ever choose a single artist or a full album and listen to the whole thing since I love the randomness of the shuffle option. There’s just something about hearing a 17-minute track from doom metal masters Electric Wizard followed by a Flock of Seagulls tune that does it for me. But as I was sitting at the table, I actually started to see a trend — when Tiffany came on, I was playing passively and poorly, but when it shuffled to Slayer I was nice and aggressive and winning hands. …