All posts tagged: John Fogerty

Kenny Aronoff

The Matt ‘N’ Jeff Radio Hour, Episode 19: Kenny Aronoff

Kenny Aronoff. For liner notes geeks like you and me, the name alone conjures up at the very least, the thought of that one really awesome drum breakdown, one which arguably put Aronoff on the radar of many for the first time. When you get the chance to interview someone like Aronoff, it’s a bit intimidating. Your mind starts to spin as you think about all of the records that this guy has been a part of…..and all of the people that he’s played with and still plays with. But as I discovered the first time that I got the chance to speak with Kenny, he’s an awesome dude. Mellow, humble and down to earth. Which is why when we started sketching out our wishlist of folks that we wanted to talk to here on the Radio Hour, I put Kenny on my short list. It didn’t take much more than sending an email his way to nail something down. From there, it was just a matter of finding a day that would work with …

slits

Greatest Un-Hits: The Slits’ “I Heard It Through the Grapevine” (1979)

The Slits’ cover of “I Heard it Through the Grapevine” should have been that one song from the weird, still-breaking genre of punk that got some radio play and introduced the mainstream to something new, and encouraged the more adventurous to seek out the weirder, outre stuff. It’s a little bit disco, it’s a lot bit tribal punk, post-Television, pre-Le Tigre frenetic, wailing three-piece orgy of infectious, but scary energy. There’s something for everybody here, but not enough people bought the 45 for it to register with Billboard. It was arguably heard by more people when used on an episode of Eastbound and Down. Covering “I Heard it Through the Grapevine” is almost a pop music rite of passage, making stars out of, or at least significantly raising the profile of pretty much anybody who’d recorded it—Smokey Robinson did it first, then Gladys Knight, then Marvin Gaye’s definitive version, then Credence Clearwater Revival’s version in 1970 that took the song’s essence, the bass hook, and stretched it out to what I’m pretty sure was a …

Bottom Feeders: The Rock End of the ’80s, Part 17

So a few weeks ago I get this e-mail from a girl named Liz which directs me to her website. Now normally, I don’t really post links to other people’s site here though I thought this one was worth it. Liz and I seem to be cut from a little bit of the same cloth. She says she never really knew much about music so she decided to take on a task that I had often thought about but was too chickenshit to do – listening to albums that comprised the book 1001 Albums You Must Listen To Before You Die. She’s listening to each album and posting her thoughts each day on one record. She’s over one year in and hasn’t given up yet. How could I not share this blog with you, as just like this journey through the world of Bottom Feeders – that shit’s crazy as well. So read this and then head on over after you’re done. I still have 362 album reviews I have to read. But before that, …

Rock Court: Fantasy v. Fogerty

When the Small Claims version of Rock Court was being kicked around, one very specific rule was initially put into play – no actual, litigated cases. Still, one got through that was too tantalizing to refuse. Popdose Podcast Poobah Dave Lifton suggested the very strange case of Fantasy Records versus John Fogerty, the former accusing the latter of duplicating a Creedence Clearwater Revival tune. The twist is obvious – that would mean John Fogerty, in essence, ripped himself off purportedly out of spite against Fantasy chief Saul Zaentz. This was too good an opportunity to pass up. It was also too good to mess around with, so we contacted our commentator friend (and real friggin’ lawyer,) Jonny the Friendly Lawyer, posed the question to him and, in a stroke of good fortune for all of us, he agreed to lay out this rather perverse case. Without further ado, we present Jonny the Friendly Lawyer and Fantasy v. Fogerty.

The Popdose Interview: Doug Clifford

When you talk about classic rhythm sections, you probably think about John Bonham and John Paul Jones or Jack Bruce and Ginger Baker. But Doug Clifford and Stu Cook, drummer and bass player, respectively, for Creedence Clearwater Revival, were responsible for recording some of the most driving and potent rhythm tracks ever laid down on tape. Clifford was a very simple drummer, but had a feel that perfectly complemented the songs of John Fogerty. For years, “Cosmo,” as he was affectionately known to friends, backed the guitarist/singer on a number of hits including “Proud Mary,” “Born on the Bayou,” “Bad Moon Rising,” and a host of others. But egos and politics came into the picture and a band that had sold millions of records, performed on the Ed Sullivan Show, appeared at Woodstock, and developed a sound that would live on for decades, was broken apart. For years, Doug Clifford has toured as part of Creedence Clearwater Revisited, a group that performs all the CCR songs in a type of greatest hits package. Stu Cook …

Bottom Feeders: The Ass End of the ’80s, Part 32

I know I said I’d be quitting the intros for a while, but I had to put this all into perspective. I hadn’t thought about the scope of this series since I first agreed to do it, but the other night it kind of hit me and put me into shock. This is post #32. Usually I get about 20 songs in each post. Which means over the course of this series so far I’ve posted somewhere around 640 songs. 640! That’s a good 50-disc box set there. Then it hit me that we’re only on the letter F. Take out letters like X and Z and we’re still only about a quarter of the way through the entire series at this point. Again, this is the 32nd week; at this pace we’re looking at 120-plus weeks, total. So by the end we’re talking two years and a few months and probably around 2,500 songs. But the good news is that I still enjoy putting each week’s post together even after eight months of them. …

Hall of Fame Week: Don Everly, John Fogerty, and “Balls”

Sometime in 1985, a new label-wide policy was instituted regarding all new signings. There were to be none. Nada. The staff was called into a departmental meeting to receive the news, which, to my mind, might as well have been notice that the oxygen supply to the building was being abruptly cut off. Success at the major label level involves constant evolution. Like the care and feeding of a miniature bonsai tree, sculpting, shaping, and pruning the roster is a delicate and subtle business that eventually yields strong roots and fine blossoms. To withhold basic nutrients is to doom the entire undertaking to a slow and withering death, and not one I cared to be a party to. But this new edict, however strange it seems, actually led me straight to my next signing. That morning I had gone through the previous day’s mail, sorting promising looking demos into one stack, and depositing the rest in the trash. Exactly what a “promising demo” looks like is anyone’s guess, and tossing the others is not flattering …