All posts tagged: Kenny Loggins

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Like, Omigod! Digging Through the ’80s Pop Culture Box, Part 20

Greetings, chronic argonauts! We’ll be stepping into the time machine in just a moment, and once we do we’re mostly going to let the music do the talking. But we wanted to take a moment to think some deep thoughts about history and nostalgia. It started when Friend of Popdose and All-Around Internet Swell Guy Andrew Weiss sent us a link to the archives of SPIN — their review of the Like, Omigod! box set, written by Jesse Berrett upon its original release in 2002. It’s worth reading in full, but a couple of lines jump out… … “Nothing about the ‘80s was naive.” Even pop’s exuberant synth-bleeps throbbed with dread. That may explain why the renewed vogue for those sounds coincided with an unwelcome ‘80s revival in the culture at large (Enron, terrorism, the threat of nuclear war). But of the 142 songs included on Like Omigod!, only one. Nena’s “99 Luftballons,” has much to say about apocalypse. As a result, Like Omigod! is a sunny retro fetish object itself — totally ‘90s, if …

Player1970s

The Popdose Interview: Peter Beckett of Player

Remember the band Player? Sure you do…and even if you think you don’t, it’ll only take three words to remind you who they are: “Baby Come Back.” That’s not by any means to suggest that there’s no more to the band than their biggest hit, mind you: they released four albums during their original run during the late ’70s and early ’80s, and despite regular claims to the contrary by the misinformed, they actually had two – count ’em – TWO top-10 hits (the other being “This Time I’m In It For Love”), and although the band’s line-up has fluctuated over the years, Player continues to reform on occasion for live dates and, believe it or not, even has a new album: Too Many Reasons, released on Frontiers Records. Popdose was fortunate enough to chat with frontman Peter Beckett about the band’s reemergence, along with a deep discussion of his past musical endeavors, including stories about opening for Jimi Hendrix and The Who, co-writing an Olivia Newton-John classic, and more. Popdose: You and Ronn Moss …

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You’re Dead to Us…Hit Songs By Older Adults, Made for Older Adults

A new series in which we look at once common curiosities of pop culture that don’t exist anymore, be it because of changing tastes, the fragmentation of culture, or merely the fickle nature of fads. My first memories of pop music are around 1981, 1982, age three or so. That dovetailed with the time my parents’ reached that point that most parents reach—when they stop actively paying attention to and keeping up with current pop music. Thus, American pop music began with “Islands in the Stream” and “Hard to Say I’m Sorry” for me, and ended with “Islands in the Stream” and “Hard to Say I’m Sorry” for my parents. Since then it’s been nothing but The Big Chill soundtrack and church music. This conscious shift into ignorance or semi-ignorance of current chart hits has happened to me, too. I’ve got a kid and a job and a novel I’m never going to finish to tackle, so there’s less time for music. Every day for a few hours while I work I take some time to listen …

Let Us In Nashville

All-Star Linda McCartney Tribute Album Scheduled for November 21

Reading the words “Linda McCartney tribute album,” you might be tempted to think that the concept of the tribute album has gone well beyond its logical end point — this is an artist whose slender discography has never been widely celebrated, and one whose musical prowess has been mocked for years — but the truth behind Let Us In Nashville is a little more complicated. For one thing, the songs collected here come from Paul McCartney’s catalog; for another, it’s all being done to benefit the Women and Cancer Fund. And finally, the album collects an eclectic array of Nashville stars to pay tribute to Linda’s life, and tops it all off with some lovely Peter Max cover artwork. More info via press release: The Women and Cancer Fund is a not-for-profit charity led by Dr. Alicia Alvarez and established in the memory of Linda McCartney. Sir Paul McCartney has given his “whole-hearted blessing” to “Let Us In” Nashville, a campaign led by Reviver Music to raise awareness and proceeds for this charity which promotes …

The Popdose Interview: Steve Conn

He’s never been a household name, but Steve Conn has produced, played with, and written for a long list of artists over the last several decades, and if you’re a fan of New Orleans roots music, you’ve almost certainly enjoyed his piano and/or accordion playing. We used the recent release of Steve’s new album, Beautiful Dream, as an excuse to have a frank, in-depth, and often ruefully funny discussion about his career, his approach to writing and performing, and the state of the music business. I was excited to see you had a new album out — I’ve been a fan of your work since 1993, when you and Sonny Landreth stole the spotlight during the “Footloose/I’m Alright” portion of Kenny Loggins’ live album, Outside: From the Redwoods. [Laughs] How kind of you. That little thing has been the most — I don’t know, the best thing I ever did was my association with that situation. It’s garnered me more fans and, I don’t know, love, than anything else I’ve done. My most recent ex-wife …

Friday Night Videos!: Christmas Eve Edition

The Popdose Staff thought that the best way to celebrate the second to last day of Mellowmas was to set the DeLorean back to the glam year of 1980, virtually the dawn of music television. Well, kinda, but not quite. MTV premiered in 1981, and promotional films for songs had long been a tool for bands and artists. However, it wasn’t yet a necessary tool for all artists, and so we were taking a real shot in the dark with some of the songs here (incidentally, not a holiday track in the bunch! Rejoice!), but what better way to spend Christmas Eve than huddled, sad and lonely, around your computer monitor watching old music videos? Well, it’s too late to RSVP for that swinging party down the street, so take a swig of that egg nog, adjust your Santa cap and stop fiddling with your candy cane. It’s time to boogie. THREE FRENCH VOTES Olivia Newton-John – Magic: The beginning and end of this week’s list shows the seismic change in the culture, from the …

Ticket Stub: Steve Miller Band in New York City, May ’76

What’s in a name? When Norton Buffalo is the name in question, the answer is, quite a lot. While the name might not be immediately familiar to you, chances are good that you’ve heard Norton Buffalo many times, both on record and on the radio as a member of The Steve Miller Band. Buffalo logged over thirty years playing the harmonica and singing background vocals with Miller, and Miller himself dubbed Buffalo as his “Partner in Harmony,” which is the way he was introduced each night on stage. But that’s just a fraction of Buffalo’s overall recorded work as a musician. Described as a singer/songwriter, country and blues harmonica player, actor, record producer, recording artist and bandleader, it seems that there is very little that Buffalo didn’t do during his life of music. Over the years, the Grammy-nominated Buffalo played on over 180 albums, including releases by Bonnie Raitt, Kenny Loggins, Commander Cody, Johnny Cash and the Doobie Brothers (including their Grammy winning release Minute by Minute).  (And all of this was in addition to …

Bottom Feeders: The Ass End of the ’80s, Part 54

So, I took the readers’ challenge (sort of) last week. I said that I knew nothing from Gordon Lightfoot except for the song I posted — “Baby Step Back” — and “The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald.” On Thursday of last week, I borrowed The Complete Greatest Hits, a 2002 Rhino collection of tunes from Mr. Lightfoot, and listened from start to finish. The first thing I can say is that Gordon really isn’t that bad. It’s not really my type of music, and I doubt I’d ever go back to it again, but that guy is a pretty smooth and mellow cat. I was told specifically that I had to know both “If You Could Read My Mind” and “Sundown.” Well, you got me halfway, at least. I had never heard “If You Could Read My Mind” before. I’m sure of that. “Sundown,” on the other hand, you were correct about — I definitely recognize that tune. I guess I had never heard Gordon’s name with it, because by title alone, it didn’t mean …

Unsolicited Career Advice for… Michael Jackson

Seems Uncle Donnie has recently taken a shine to the King of Pop; this particular missive was near the top of the Skwatzenschitz archive.  MJ could do worse than follow some of the advice therein; then again, he could also almost assuredly do better. —RS TO: Michael Jackson FROM: Don Skwatzenschitz RE: Career advice Mike, I gotta tell ya, Mitzi and I were at this party up in the Berkshires last weekend (the weather was gorgeous, and the place we stayed had a slide that emptied out into a hot tub.  Amazing.  You should consider it sometime—the kids would love it), and the damnedest thing happened.  It was pretty quiet—you know, little hors d’oeuvres, sparkly drinks, polite conversation, and the like—until somebody had the khutspe to ask the string quartet to play “Don’t Stop ‘Til You Get Enough.” You should have seen it, Mike.  Eighty-year-old women and their grandkids, bustin’ moves all over the place—and this is without a backbeat!  It was a skirt-hikin’ good time. Got me to thinking how perfect the timing is …

The Eighteenth Day of Mellowmas: The Unimaginable Mellowmas

Jason: Before we play this track –  “December” by Kenny Loggins — we should acknowledge that this was one of the only Mellowmas suggestions we received this whole season. Jeff: Mainly so people know who to blame.This one wasn’t our fault! We knew about this album — oh yes, we knew. But we avoided it. Jason: Robert Smith, everybody. Blame Robert Smith. And no, not from The Cure. Robert Smith who wrote that awesome CHART ATTACK! earlier this year. Jeff: Man, I wish The Cure would record a Christmas album. Jason: You know why I avoided this track, specifically? Jeff: Why, specifically? Jason: Because it was released in 1998. Jeff: Deep in the heart of Kenny’s “Enema Period.” Jason: YES. Jeff: I know what you mean. Jason: When everybody was FORCED to know about his undying love for his wife. When we had to know all the details of their Unimaginable Life. Jeff: Please, don’t talk about it. Jason: I bought the CD for my mom. One day, I was bored and read the liner …

Into the Ear of Madness: Week 16 — Caught in the Middle of McD’s Rhodes and Foster’s Acoustic Grand

Over the next year Terje Fjelde has agreed to listen to nothing but David Foster on his iPod. He’s loaded the thing with over 1,200 songs produced, arranged, composed, and/or played by David Foster. A deal with the devil? He keeps wondering. Today’s entry is dedicated in its entirety to a genuine soft rock classic, a formidable milestone which embodies just about everything I love about this kind of music. It’s more or less a re-post of an entry I did for my own blog a couple of year ago, but no one read it then and I can’t think of a better way to describe it, so here we go: Kenny Loggins – “Heart to Heart,” from High Adventure (1982) Kenny Loggins was never the one who kicked you in the ass with his no-nonsense musical attitude. He’s more like the musical equivalent of a friendly pat on the shoulder – and yes, he’s frequently nonsensical. But that doesn’t really bother me. He’s had a couple of magical moments in his career, and this …

The Friday Mixtape: 8/29/08

Michael Jackson turns 50 today. Fifty! Jacko is five-oh! Hard to believe, probably because the man hasn’t acted his age — or looked his age, for that matter — in years, but ever since he was a preteen he’s created timeless music, first with his brothers in the Jackson 5, then on his own as the biggest pop star of the ’80s. If you don’t own Off the Wall or Thriller, buy them right this instant. (Seriously, Jackson could probably use the royalty checks these days.) The former is a perfect combination of pop, soul, and disco, every track a winner, while the latter lives up to its title, a greatest-hits factory that cranked out one monster smash after another. Below is a mix of singles, album cuts, and demos by Jackson, plus covers by other artists, hip-hop songs that sample his work, a pair of songs that employ his backing vocals, and a remix/update that lights a fire under the one weak track from Thriller. There’s even a special birthday wish from a 1991 …