All posts tagged: Limp Bizkit

Fredlostok

The Twenty-Second Day of Mellowmas: VEIHNACHTEN!

Jason: Weren’t we talking recently about our lack of Mellowmas songs in other languages? Jeff: We totally were. You’re about to make me wish we weren’t, aren’t you? They can’t all be as much fun as gentle, pine-crotched Wolfgang C. Gmoser. Jason: Well, as you know, I mentally block out each of our chats after we have them. But I’m never going to forget VERGISSMEINNICHT. Jeff: God, who could forget VERGISSMEINNICHT? That shit was horrifying. Jason: Well, yeah. That’s what I remember. I don’t remember what it means at all. Other than nightmares for days. Jeff: It means “forget-me-not,” and I recall that the CD I ordered you was supposed to come with a “surprise on top.” Was it a lock of Benny Mardones’ hair? One of Timothy B. Schmit’s talons? I’ve wondered all these years. Jason: I think it was the tighty-whities from one of the guys in Ambrosia. Jeff: VERGISSMEINNICHT! Jason: In any case, I think I might have found another VERGISSMEINNICHT. Not that there can ever be another VERGISSMEINNICHT, but if there …

human-highway

10 Movies…Directed By Rock and Pop Stars (To Prepare You for Rob Zombie’s ‘The Lords of Salem’)

Lots of musicians decide they are famous and attractive enough to act, but it takes a special kind of hubris to take a break from making music to direct a movie. Sometimes it works out, as with the fruitful horror filmmaking career of Rob Zombie, whose The Lords of Salem comes out this week. Here are some others who gave it a shot. The Education of Charlie Banks The guy who got an Oscar nomination for The Social Network was once directed by Fred Durst, the guy who wrote the line “gimme somethin’ to break / how ‘bout your fuckin’ face.” But he does know what it’s like to be a violent thug, so there’s that. Yentl Streisand has one of the greatest voices ever, and she’s a good actress, too. And then there’s this literal vanity project, in which the 41-year-old Streisand directs her own performance as a teenager, who disguises herself as a boy to attend a yeshiva. Falling From Grace Ol’ John Cougar made himself up a movie-film real good like, with …

Greatest Un-Hits: Class of ’99’s “Another Brick in the Wall (Part 2)” (1998)

Grunge rock came out of the punk tradition, sidestepping the decade and a half of corporate rock that came in between punk’s prime of 1977 and grunge’s rise in 1991. The genre thus traded on the premise that it would never do the things that more commercial rock would never do, like objectify women, learn to play their instruments well, or make a sell-out ‘70s rock move like form a supergroup for a quick paycheck. That’s why it’s confusing and surprising that a bunch of grunge guys would form a one-off supergroup to cover, non-ironically, a technically proficient, ultra-popular rock classic for the soundtrack of a teen horror flick. It’s even more confusing and surprising that this bland project wouldn’t bring bland mainstream success, especially since in 1998 Pearl Jam had scored a #2 pop hit with its semi-jokey cover of the ‘60s teen-death-pop gem “Last Kiss.” Class of ’99 was made up of Jane’s Addiction drummer Stephen Perkins, Porno for Pyros bassist Martyn LeNoble, Rage Against the Machine’s way-too-Marxist for this guitarist Tom Morello, and …

Greatest Un-Hits: RevCo’s “Da Ya Think I’m Sexy” (1993)

In failing to make this a hit song, the Revolting Cocks (or RevCo, if you like) could have done two things better. 1) They should have released this song about seven years later, after Orgy, Marilyn Manson, and Limp Bizkit, made screamy-metal-ironic-covers of pop songs by creeps a mini-fad, with their respective covers of “Blue Monday,” “Sweet Dreams,” and “Faith.” 2) They should have picked a name besides “the Revolting Cocks.” It was still a good three years before the Butthole Surfers achieved a mainstream breakthrough with “Pepper” in spite of its semi-profane band name, which in turn  laid the groundwork for acceptance of bands with semi-profane band names. (Hence the RevCo.) A hard-driving groove-metal number with a good beat that you can dance to, a la Korn’s “Got the Life,” this Ministry side project’s cover of Rod Stewart’s “Da Ya Think I’m Sexy” is, as mentioned on this site once before, superior to the original. Even sung by Al Jourgensen amidst a wall of metal sludge, it’s less creepy than creepy Rod Stewart’s take. …

Unsolicited Career Advice for… Scott Weiland

Uncle Donnie gets pissed very rarely, but when he does he can certainly lay into you. I wonder what Scott Weiland thought when he got this. —RS TO: Scott Weiland FROM: Don Skwatzenschitz RE: Career advice I get mad at you, Scott Weiland, and I don’t get mad at many people. There you are, genius songwriter, rock god, wearer of mascara, and the same hair dye my wife, Mitzi, swears by. Yet you constantly, constantly sabotage yourself. Stone Temple Pilots could have been the biggest band in the world, but you wanted to get high instead. So you break up. You clean up. You work with Daniel Lanois. You practically join Guns n’ Roses. Contraband: best hard rock record of the decade. Libertad: not so much. You get yourself fired from Velvet Revolver, you rejoin STP, you put on some really good shows. Then you put on some really bad shows, stumbling around, ranting and raving. What’s wrong, Scott? I’m worried about you. Remember the cookout we had up in Kennebunkport back in ’94, when …

Chartburn: 2/29/08

Mainstream Rock: INXS, “Suicide Blonde” (1990) John: I was always appreciative of INXS for holding X back until 1990 so I could accurately say their best stuff was back in the ’80s. There are currently 272 used copies of X available on Amazon for one cent each. Vrabel: Was this the period when INXS was dropping, like, four albums a year? I seem to remember them having a fairly ludicrous output around this time. Not a bad song, I guess. Was X the album that had “Not Enough Time”? That’s not a bad song either, I guess. David: “Not Enough Time” was on Welcome to Wherever You Are, which was a pretty damned underrated album. Few people loved INXS as much as I did in the ’80s, but “Suicide Blonde” just felt off to me. Every record up to that point was an expansion on the previous one, but X marked the first time that the band just tried to repeat the previous album. Loved the second single, “Disappear,” …