All posts tagged: metal

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Welcome To Pittsburgh #5: Night Vapor/T-Tops/Gangwish – Gooski’s, 5/30/15

Is it smoky in here or is it just me? [Rubs tears from bloodshot-red eyes; guy next to me passes out from lack of oxygen.] No, it’s definitely goddamn smoky in here. So, so, so, take off your momma-made sweater and your Velcro-strap sneakers and bark hello to the neighborhood of fucking make-believe! This is the fifth installment of Welcome To Pittsburgh … Now Go Home, friends, and tonight we’re reporting from the front lines of the dive bar scene, the legendary Gooski’s, where the drinks are cheap, the music’s loud, and the smoke (of both the tobacco and marijuana variety) is thick and welcoming and loverly. Somebody must’ve forgot to tell guitarist/vocalist/man-about-town Patrick Waters and, um, just about everybody else in Polish Hill that T-Tops weren’t headlining this dual record-release shindig – the band was second on a three-act bill – because they goddamned owned Saturday night. The crowd was thickest and loudest for them. The walls and floors shook the most when they played. The set was impeccable; not a note was out of place. …

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Review: Zu – “Cortar Todo”

Want a quick hit summary on an interesting record? Zu’s Cortar Todo, out now on Mr. Mike Patton’s Ipecac Records, is a mind-bending mélange of metal, grindcore, math-rock and no-wave. Boom: there’s the two cents. Wait: no. Take two! Cortar Todo, out now on Ipecac, feels inconsistent in spots but it also is blessed with a kind of morbid inconsistency. No, that sounds ridiculous. How about, “It welcomes the ability to manipulate space?” Yeah, yeah, thanks Asimov. It is a great record. Well. It is weird around the edges. Sometimes. You should hear it either way. Probably. I think. The record is perplexing, for good reason. It pairs knockout tracks (the metal-for-the-masses thrash of “Rudra Dances Over Burning Rome”) with meandering sound experiments that seem to be ill-placed or ill-sequenced (“Serpens Cauda”).  In one breath, it’s truly mesmerizing art-metal (“Orbital Equilibria”). In the next, it falls down the same traps as other bands of its ilk, which think the answer to stagnancy is more takes on electronica (Sorry guest Joey Karam, I’m not buying most …

Calgary’s the Unravelling Stage a “Revolt”

In 2010, Canada’s hard-rocking duo the Unravelling released their debut album to critical acclaim; the press dubbed it an “industrial-infused metal masterpiece.” They showed true promise of channeling venerated bands like Tool, NIN, the Dillinger Escape Plan, and others. Then, one year later, they were forced to put their dreams on hold when lead singer Steve Moore fell ill. He spent the next year and a half in surgery and recovery. The future of the Unravelling was, indeed, unraveling. But, behind the scenes, Moore’s partner in crime, Gustavo De Beauville, was honing his production skills and working on keeping up the momentum and even released some solo work. Then, as Moore recovered, the duo came back together and began to work on their first new tracks in years. One might expect a band that’s been on hiatus to ease themselves back into the game, but not these guys. Their first single, “Revolt,” is perhaps the most aptly titled comeback song of all time. As Moore says, “The song was the first piece of new material Gus …