All posts tagged: Michael McDonald

ckrossfire

C(k)rossfire! Or, Who’s Better: Christopher Cross vs. Kris Kross

The contestants: Christopher Cross is the undisputed king of ultra laid-back, early 1980s soft rock with songs a working-class man’s man could relate to, such as “Sailing.” Kris Kross were teenage rappers who in 1992 wore backwards overalls and with their  hit “Jump” made slightly moving up and down a dance craze. But which one of these acts, Christopher Cross, or Kris Kross, is better? Why do we need to know? Because they have similar names. Really, that’s it. But that’s enough, isn’t it? (Is it?) (It is.)   Round 1: Better Svengali Cross was discovered and championed (and assisted on his first single, “Ride Like the Wind”) by Michael McDonald, Doobie Brother, mustache escort, Mad TV star, and enthusiast of all that which is mellow. Kris Kross was discovered by Jeraine Dupri, songwriter, producer, and head of So So Def  Records. While Dupri used to bone Janet Jackson (Miss Jackson, because he’s legitimately nasty) on a regular basis, introduced Da Brat-a-tat-tat to the world, and may possibly have invented grillz, he is not three-time Grammy Award winner Michael McDonald. Advantage: …

ConSoulTant

The Fourteenth Day of Mellowmas: Consoulted

Jeff: Ah, one day closer to the 25th. I can see the light at the end of the tunnel! Soon, we will be free once more from the tyranny of Mellowmas. Jason: You know, I get excited about this every year, and then on the 26th, you inevitably send me something for the following year. And then I feel all awful again. Jeff: It’s a tradition! I love doing that. Jason: The very worst tradition. I wish you’d stop. Jeff: The best is when I can send a physical CD and address it to Jason Bieber Hare. Hey, remember when Busta Rhymes did a cameo on a Justin Bieber holiday song? That seemed pretty bad at the time, but I kind of miss it now. Jason: Yeah. Who knew how bad things were going to get? You know, I know I’m a little late on this, but I just read an article about how many people went out to the stores on Thanksgiving. Jeff: I swear to God, if you’re about to tell me that …

kenny

You’re Dead to Us…Hit Songs By Older Adults, Made for Older Adults

A new series in which we look at once common curiosities of pop culture that don’t exist anymore, be it because of changing tastes, the fragmentation of culture, or merely the fickle nature of fads. My first memories of pop music are around 1981, 1982, age three or so. That dovetailed with the time my parents’ reached that point that most parents reach—when they stop actively paying attention to and keeping up with current pop music. Thus, American pop music began with “Islands in the Stream” and “Hard to Say I’m Sorry” for me, and ended with “Islands in the Stream” and “Hard to Say I’m Sorry” for my parents. Since then it’s been nothing but The Big Chill soundtrack and church music. This conscious shift into ignorance or semi-ignorance of current chart hits has happened to me, too. I’ve got a kid and a job and a novel I’m never going to finish to tackle, so there’s less time for music. Every day for a few hours while I work I take some time to listen …

The Popdose Interview: Tom Johnston of The Doobie Brothers

New albums from a classic band or artist can sometimes be a dodgy proposition. But when I saw the news last year that The Doobie Brothers had a new album on tap, their first release of new material in 10 years, I was intrigued. The Doobies had an ace up their sleeve – they had coaxed (and as you can see from the conversation below, one could argue that it was the songs) legendary producer and longtime Doobie associate/friend Ted Templeman (Van Halen, Aerosmith, Little Feat) out of his semi-retired state to produce what would become World Gone Crazy. Since the album’s release in late 2010, the Doobies have been turning heads, notching a top 40 debut on the Billboard Top 200 charts and even generating radio airplay which came initially via the first single “Nobody,” a song that was rescued and re-recorded at the suggestion of Templeman from their original self-titled 1971 debut release (and it holds special significance as being the first song and also the first album they ever recorded with Templeman). …

The Friday Mixtape: 9/17/10 — Double Shots

In this week’s mixtape you’ll find pairs of the same song by two different artists. I did try to lay down some ground rules for myself,  though: 1. No parody songs (although strange and unusual remakes were highly encouraged, as you’ll find). 2. No Beatles songs (except for one, and it was them covering someone else’s song). 3. In honor of our Grand Poobah, find a spot for Michael McDonald. It’s half the songs, but twice the fun! And as a special bonus, I threw in an extra song in honor of International Talk Like a Pirate Day (Sunday, September 19th). Enjoy! The Ballad of Davy Crockett from A Legacy in Song Tim Curry – The Ballad of Davy Crockett from Music From The Park Carl Perkins – Blue Suede Shoes from The Fabulous Fifties: Back to the Fifties Lemmy and the Upsetters with Mick Green – Blue Suede Shoes from The Last Temptation of Elvis Elton John and Kiki Dee – Don’t Go Breaking My Heart from Sounds of the Seventies: 1976 The Wild …

Popdose Flashback ’90: Michael McDonald, “Take It to Heart”

I am 16. It’s July, and I’m in Florida, where, to quote my uncle Larry, the air is so fucking wet that you won’t notice if you towel off after stepping out of the shower. I’m visiting my grandparents, but really, I wander off alone whenever I can; I spend hours wandering the streets of their town. I read William Diehl’s Hooligans, a pulpy murder mystery whose protagonist is haunted by an impossible love. I watch the sun setting on the beach, but I don’t focus on the sun; instead, my eyes are on the lightning streaking over the horizon. I hope for rain. I want to stand in it. No; I want it to wash me away. I want to be gone, in the way that only being 16 and heartbroken can make you want to be gone. I’m not crying, but I feel like I should be. Like it might break some emotional dam somewhere, and clear out this misery in one huge, fluid rush. And I listen, again and again and again, …