All posts tagged: Oni Press

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Confessions of a Comics Shop Junkie, No. 81

It’s that time of  the month again…time for another Confessions of a you-know-what, in which I opine on various comics and graphic novel releases in the last month, most of which should be on sale at a comics shop or online retailer in your general vicinity. THE SHADOW #1 Script: Garth Ennis, Art: Dynamite Entertainment; $3.99 So many legacy heroes have been revived in the last decade or so by companies like Dynamite, Moonstone, and others that I suppose it was inevitable that one of them should get around to arguably the most potent and interesting of them all: The Shadow. When it comes to comics, Ol’ “Who Knows What Evil Lurks” has had it pretty good, all things considered– if you overlook the oddball long-underwear Archie Comics version, there was the 70’s DC series, which featured excellent art by Mike Kaluta (whose version in a lot of ways defined the character for everyone for decades after, and remains one of the characters the artist is most associated with), Frank Robbins, and E.R. Cruz as …

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Confessions of a Comics Shop Junkie, No. 80

Here we go again with Confessions of a Comics Shop Junkie, in which I opine on various recently released publications of the sequential graphic nature, some of which may be sitting on the rack at a comics shop, or awaiting the click of a button on some online merchant’s web page, near you. If you’re lucky. Or not, as the case may be. BABY’S IN BLACK: ASTRID KIRCHHERR, STUART SUTCLIFFE, AND THE BEATLES Script/Art: Arne Bellestorf First Second Books; $24.99 Gosh, I just love it when my interests intersect! There are thousands of stories peripheral to to the Beatles. and very few of them are as poignant as the one of the brief life of original bassist Stu Sutcliffe and his even more short-lived romance with German photographer Astrid Kirchherr. For those of you who may not know the story, Sutcliffe was the first bass player in the early incarnations of what we came to know as the Beatles. John’s friend, and it was at John’s insistence that he be in what was still, at …

Confessions of a Comics Shop Junkie, No. 71

Ah me, the hurrier I go the behinder I get, as the saying goes. Welcome back to another tardy edition of Confessions, in which I opine on various recently released publications of the sequential graphic nature, some of which may be sitting on the rack at a comics shop, or awaiting the click of a button on some online merchant’s web page, near you. If you’re lucky. Or not, as the case may be. THE LEAGUE OF EXTRAORDINARY GENTLEMEN: CENTURY: 1969 Script: Alan Moore, Art: Kevin O’Neill Top Shelf, $9.95 At first I thought that Alan Moore had dusted off an old Promethea story and changed the principals to suit his needs; I suppose it’s not quite that, but it’s awfully darn close. Mr. Moore certainly does seem to feel the need to go to his arcane magick well quite often; at least here it’s in the service of…well, if not satire, at perhaps homage though I can’t imagine Moore revering anything but himself. Anyway, and I’m assuming you’re all at least superficially aware of the basic …

Confessions of a Comics Shop Junkie, No. 69

Here we go again with a long-gestating edition of Confessions of a Comics Shop Junkie, in which I opine on various recently released publications of the sequential graphic nature, some of which may be sitting on the rack at a comics shop, or awaiting the click of a button on some online merchant’s web page, near you. If you’re lucky. Or not, as the case may be. THE HIDDEN Script/Art: Richard Sala Fantagraphics, $19.99 (scheduled for release in September 2011) Richard Sala’s latest features everything you’ve come to expect from him- gnarly plot, idiosyncratic, easy-to-like art, and quirky horror movie homages; however, rather the some shuddery 30’s style Old Dark House/Ten Little Indians meets Nancy Drew style murder mystery that is his standard M.O., although there are elements of that here, we get what at first appears to be a kind of Five/The World, the Flesh, and the Devil post apocalyptic scenario, with two couples and a mysterious old man wandering through deserted, ruined cities to an ambiguous, and ultimately world-threatening destination. But this being Sala, he can’t resist throwing in …

Confessions of a Comics Shop Junkie, No. 67

Well, hello there! It’s been a while, I know. I’ve had a variety of real world issues taking up my time and attention, including a death in the family and a graphic design project (for- gasp- pay) that wound up taking a LOT more time to complete than I initially thought. So my humblest apologies for the hiatus. I’ll try not to let it become a habit. Wouldn’t you know it, while I was away all hell broke loose in the world of comics thanks to DC’s announcement that they will be relaunching nearly all their titles in the near future, starting over with new #1 issues and new creative teams, for better or worse, as well as providing day-and-date downloads, of interest to those who like to read their comics via iPads and smartphones and such, and certainly this is of more interest to those who can afford these devices than to me, who’s stuck in 2006. Anyway, of the newish series, some are potentially intriguing, like the prospect of a Wonder Woman series …

Comic Review: “Stumptown”

If you were to ask what makes Greg Rucka a strong writer, my answer would be that it is everything that he leaves out of his stories. It’s not that he’s omitting important information or not completely explaining all of the action and intrigue. It’s just that he knows how much he has to tell his reader and how much he can let them discover on their own. His Queen and Country, featuring a wonderful blend of character and action, is some of the leanest writing that you can find in comic books even as he tackles the complicated and real world of international espionage. Working with a variety of artistic collaborators in Queen and Country, there is no image or word that is extraneous, flowery or just redundant. Rucka whittles his stories down to their barest essence, creating strong and driven stories that are rich but give the readers room to figure things out on their own. Rucka actually trusts his readers to keep up with him and to be able to understand everything …

Confessions of a Comics Shop Junkie, No. 46: Best of 2010 Edition

Yep, like the title says, it’s time for me to do that list-making thing that we internet pundits do so love to do. And, as I always have done on my own sadly neglected blog, I feel I must preface this list with a disclaimer. The following entries are in no way intended to be the be-all and end-all absolute best comics and/or graphic novels of the past calendar year. There are many, many fine, worthy and worthwhile publications both physical and on the World Wide Internet that I did not have the opportunity, for whatever reason, to partake of. I like to think I read and keep up with what’s au courant, but alas, issues of time, money, and interest tend to hinder me in pursuit of that goal. I enjoyed all of these more than any others I read this year, and recommend them highly. Simple as that. OK, disclaimer complete, here’s my Personal Best of 2010 list. An even dozen. I shall cite them alphabetically so as not to imply (or infer, …

Confessions of a Comics Shop Junkie, No. 32

Here we go again with Confessions of a Comics Shop Junkie, in which I opine upon a handful of recent releases of the comic book and/or graphic novel type, some of which may even still be on the rack at a comics shop near you, or available via the click of a button and the insertion of bank card information from an online merchant, if you’re lucky. Or if you’re not, as the case may be. Shall we? DRACULA: THE COMPANY OF MONSTERS #1 Script: Kurt Busiek, Daryl Gregory; Art: Scott Godlewski Boom! Studios, $3.99 Another modern-day take on the venerable vampire, this time spearheaded by Kurt (Astro City) Busiek, as solid a scripter as the come, but not one particularly known for his innovative ideas. That said, this is set up fairly well, with DaVinci Code and Raiders of the Lost Ark overtones. Teamed up with novelist Gregory, we get introduced to the cast in this first issue, including our POV guy (or protagonist for now, anyway- he may be destined to take the …

Confessions of a Comics Shop Junkie, No. 27

I really need to create a neato-keeno banner like all the music guys have. Anyway, here we go again with Confessions of a Comics Shop Junkie, in which I opine on various recently released publications of the sequential graphic nature, some of which may be sitting on the rack at a comics shop, or awaiting the click of a button on some online merchant’s web page, near you. If you’re lucky. Or not, as the case may be. SCOTT PILGRIM Vol. 6: SCOTT PILGRIM’S FINEST HOUR Script/Art: Bryan Lee O’Malley Oni Press, $11.99 It’s been quite the ride, this Scott Pilgrim series, from when Bryan Lee O’Malley was first known only for a handful of webcomics as well as his standalone graphic novel Lost at Sea. Then, word filtered throughout the fledgling Comics Blogosphere about his next project, Scott Pilgrim’s Precious Little Life, and things would never be the same. It was your basic internet success story, debuting to near-unanimous praise for its imaginative, clever, even audacious at times art and story. Of course, it …

Confessions of a Comics Shop Junkie, Numero Diez y séis: Hellboy en Mexico, The Sixth Gun, and more

Here we go again with Confessions of a Comics Shop Junkie, in which I attempt to point out, in often rambling fashion, various offerings of a sequential graphics-type nature that I think might be worth your time to check out, or in some cases, avoid- many of which will still be on sale at various booksellers, both online and real-world, near you. HELLBOY IN MEXICO Script: Mike Mignola; Art: Richard Corben Dark Horse Comics, $3.50 One of the best things about the whole Hellboy thing is how adaptable the big guy is to pretty much whatever mythology you (or Mignola, to be more precise) want to insert him into- African legends, Norse mythology, European superstitious and religious beliefs, Arthurian legends? Why sure! So it’s a natural that eventually Mike would get around to Mexican wrestling of the Lucha Libre variety, most certainly legendary in some circles and a religion in others, just in time for Cinco de Mayo. And, in the best grindhouse cinema tradition, not only do we get masked wrestler adventure, but masked …

Confessions of a Comics Shop Junkie, No. 9: “American Vampire,” “Hercules: Fall of an Avenger,” and More

Number nine…number nine… Yes, here we go with yet another Confessions of a Comics Shop Junkie, in which I attempt to point out some various publications of a comic-bookish nature that I think might be worth your time to check out, or in some cases, avoid- many of which will still be on sale at various booksellers, both online and offline, near you. AMERICAN VAMPIRE #1 Script: Scott Snyder, Stephen King; Art: Rafael Albuquerque DC/Vertigo, $3.99 Despite Benecio Del Toro and co.’s best (?) efforts, vampires are still all the rage these days, even the non-sparkly ones, so it was only a matter of time before Vertigo got in on the act, and here we have the result. Of course, most of the buzz is about King’s byline, and I’ll be the first to admit that I’m usually skeptical about writers of his celebrity “slumming” by writing comics; I usually figure an assistant, or some other uncredited writer, does the honors in exchange for the publicity. If that’s the case here, it doesn’t seem that …

Confessions of a Comics Shop Junkie, No. 8: “Doom Patrol,” “The Twelve,” and More

Time once more for Confessions of a Comics Shop Junkie, in which I attempt to spotlight several works of sequential graphic storytelling that I find noteworthy and think you might too, many of which may still be purchased for your very own personal enjoyment at a comics shop, bookstore, or online merchant near you if you’re lucky. Or not, as the case may be. Gonna be a short one this week.  I get my comics on a bi-weekly basis, and I won’t get my box till Friday, and I don’t really want to foist a bunch of reviews of two-week-old comics on you. Still, I managed to find a few things lying around the Internets…so let’s dance. DOOM PATROL #8 Script: Keith Giffen, Art: Matthew Clark, Ron Randall DC Comics, $2.99 There are some characters that publishers just won’t leave alone, even though the public continually votes in the negative with its wallets, try as they might to freshen them up with bold new directions and fresh new ideas. Most of the time, it’s fitting …