All posts tagged: Ronnie Lane

DVD Review: “British Invasion”

On February 7, 1964, the Beatles arrived in America, and everything changed. When I say everything, I don’t just mean music. The world was never the same. The societal upheaval was simply unprecedented. The new found freedom the Liverpool quartet inspired would have profound consequences, both positive and negative, for generations to come. And the Beatles were not alone. Behind them marched an army of young British musicians determined to conquer America. This movement of musical troops across our borders became known at the British Invasion. More than 45 years later, a new DVD series is set to storm these shores again with the first four DVDs in a new British Invasion series. The first four titles are: Dusty Springfield – Once Upon A Time 1964-1969 Small Faces – All Or Nothing 1965-1968 Gerry & the Pacemakers – It’s Gonna Be Alright 1963-1965 Herman’s Hermits – Listen People 1964-1969 Each DVD traces the arc of the artist’s career, using complete performance video clips, often culled from television appearances. Interspersed among the clips are contemporary interviews …

Cratedigger: Faces, “A Nod Is as Good as a Wink … to a Blind Horse”

More than anything else, A Nod Is as Good as a Wink … to a Blind Horse is an album that reminds us. It reminds us of the great songwriter, singer, bass player, and overall beautiful spirit Ronnie Lane, and how much we miss him. Ronnie’s greatest song, “Debris,” is here. This tender tune that he wrote for his father never fails to move me, and when Rod joins in on that bridge, the whole thing becomes simply transcendent. If we need reminding, here is the proof that at his best, Rod Stewart was the greatest rock vocalist of his time. Any number of performances here will confirm that. Ronnie Wood was once a stellar guitar player. Listen to his slide work on “That’s All You Need” if you don’t believe me. Ian McLagan, bless his heart, was, and is, one of the the premier keyboard players on the planet. Oh, and we’re reminded of what was once good about radio. After all, the rollicking “Stay With Me,” Faces’ biggest hit, got tons of airplay. …

CD Review: Ian McLagan & the Bump Band, “Never Say Never”

I’m not much of a believer in band reunions — they seldom result in any output that actually improves the band’s legacy, and often have just the opposite effect. Still, I was thrilled recently when rumors of a Faces reunion were all over the Internet. First of all, the Faces were always one of my favorite bands; second, despite the presence of future superstars Rod Stewart and Ron Wood, they never really got the shot that they deserved. Of course, a lot of that was of their own mischievous making. In many ways the world has come to see the Faces as the perennial scrappy underdogs. Most of the Faces have gone on to solo careers, to one degree of success or another. Beloved bassist and songwriter Ronnie Lane died in 1997. None of them have been able to recreate the special vibe that a Faces album had, though; it was some sort of magic blend of carefree rock and roll, and cry in your beer pathos. Faces (and Small Faces) keyboard player Ian McLagan …