All posts tagged: Rush

overgrowth

5 Songs That Inspired the Otherworldly Talent of Robert Nix

“No, I won’t go with the flow, because if I do, I’ll end up where everybody else goes.” Those are probably the most descriptive and autobiographical words taken straight from Robert Nix’s lead single, “Won’t Go With the Flow” from his new album, Blue Moon. Self admittedly inspired by music from a plethora of eras and venues, he’s created a subgenere all his own, with a blend of rock, New Wave, indie, and a bit of psychedelia all his own. (If you with Talking Heads would have collaborated with early Syd Barrett, you’re in luck.) We were dying to find out more about how Nix invented his infectious sound, so we asked him for five influential songs that inspired him. Here’s what he said. 1. “Magical Mystery Tour,” The Beatles The energetic opener to the Beatles’ psychedelic masterpiece of an album and probably some of the first music I ever heard courtesy of my sister’s vinyl record. This album in particular made its way into my bloodstream — I never did get off that bus, it seems. 2. “Strange Days,” …

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EhOR: Max Webster brought weirdness to the mainstream

Editor’s note: In this installment of EhOR, Jay Kumar examines the career of Canadian prog-rockers Max Webster, who could never escape the shadow of their friends and tourmates Rush. The mid-1970s were an interesting time for music. The big dinosaur rock acts were getting bloated, disco and punk were taking root, and soft rock ruled the airwaves. But in Sarnia, Ontario, a different sound was emerging. Formed in 1973 from the ashes of several Toronto-area bands (Zooom, Rock Show of the Yeomen, Family at Macs and Sally and the Bluesman), Max Webster was formed by singer-guitarist Kim Mitchell and bassist Mike Tilka. The name was inspired by Jethro Tull’s idea of using the name of someone who was not in the band; Tilka has said in recent interviews that the name was taken from his old band Family at Max (which featured future Genesis touring guitarist Daryl Stuermer) and their tune “Song for Webster.” Augmented by drummer Paul Kersey and keyboardist Jim Bruton, the band started out doing Who and Jethro Tull covers in local …

Cowboy Mouth

A Music Major Confesses: I Love Rock and Roll

Majoring in music was never the most practical choice, but I did it anyway. I double-majored in philosophy and called myself “pre-law” for any concerned parents who thought I was wasting my education, then found my career path by spending all my time at the Duke newspaper office. The funny thing was the music itself, which bore little resemblance to the music that fueled my life and does so to this day. I spent four semesters studying music history, the first one and a half covering the era before Bach. The last ended with some comical avant-garde stuff that had the more delicate ears in the class racing to leave the room. Stockhausen might not be a “trigger warning” requiring a safe zone, but it’s safe to say we didn’t all run out and buy CDs of whatever he was composing. Outside class, I was still listening to the music that was my lifeline as a nerdy high schooler back in the days when “nerd” and “geek” were not good things to be. I had …

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10 Movies For American Audiences About Sports That Aren’t Popular in America (Like ‘Rush’)

I’m sure that the story of famed Formula One car-racing man Rushmore “Rush” Rushingford is an interesting human drama packed with thrilling twists and turns, otherwise an A-list director couldn’t get a movie like Rush made. But still, it’s the sign of some Hollywood hubris to make a big-budget, widely-released movie for American audiences about a sport that most Americans aren’t familiar with, let alone follow or enjoy. Here are 10 other A-level movies about B-level sports. Side Out C. Thomas. C. Thomas Howell. C. Thomas Howell plays beach volleyball, which tends to do well on American TV only when its being played in the Olympics by ladies in sports bras, and not for pretend by C. Thomas Howell. Kicking and Screaming Will Ferrell took a break of playing wacky characters to play a regular guy caught up in the no-stakes and dreary world of soccer. Invictus Most Americans probably don’t know how important of a moment the 1995 Rugby World Cup was in the history of South Africa or the life of Nelson Madela, …

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Like, Omigod! Digging Through the ’80s Pop Culture Box, Part 6

Oof. This week’s batch of songs are – well, they’re certainly songs that were on the radio in the 1980s. #6 Billy Vera and the Beaters, “At This Moment” (1981) Peaked at #79 on its initial release; the 1987 re-release hit #1 Hot 100 and Adult Contemporary. Dw. Dunphy – I’m going to get slaughtered by the hardcore Billy Vera fans out there (gotta be some of those, right?) but this is one of the most desperate, teeth-grindingly bathetic songs ever. Vera has made a decent living as a sitcom theme song singer and this track, though not recorded for a sitcom, came to power as Alex P. Keaton’s love song in Family Ties. Matt Wardlaw – There’s at least one hardcore fan of BV, Dunphy. Watch yourself! Jack Feerick – You’re a hardcore fan of bacterial vaginosis? Mike Heyliger – As good as heartbroken, blue-eyed soul gets. I’ve sung this one loudly to no one in particular during many of my moments of infatuation and heartbreak, although my favorite memory of the song has …

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Rush, Donna Summer, Heart, P.E. & More: Meet The Rock Hall Class of 2013

Imagine a year when the Rock ‘n Roll Hall of Fame nominees are announced and everyone shut up? Well, that’ll never happen, but most people seem fairly cool with this year’s inducted artists, who were announced by Flea of the Red Hot Chili Peppers at a press conference yesterday. Let’s take a quick look at this year’s nominees-who will officially be inducted next spring. Albert King: One of two posthumous honorees (he died in ’92,) blues guitarist King didn’t have […]

50Prog50: The Best Prog Albums, Part Five

There’s been a lot of comments about this series and I want to thank everyone, even the folks who are incensed that I didn’t make The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway the #1 choice. The beauty of the Internet democracy is that you can make your own list and I will look forward to reading it. The most comments I’ve been getting from various outlets (comments, Facebook, Twitter, e-mail, rock through the window) have been like this: “Why do you hate Emerson Lake and Palmer?” I don’t hate ELP, but one of the necessary ingredients for my list candidates was that you had to appreciate the album straight through, even if some of the songs don’t scream “Prog!” When I was a teenager, it was cool that the band rocked-up classical pieces. Nowadays, it just doesn’t seem as clever anymore, and they come off like audio Cliffs Notes rather than good ideas. That wouldn’t be a problem if they didn’t stuff almost every one of their albums with a redux. Heck, Pictures At An Exhibition …

Live Music: Rush in Mountain View, Calif., 8/9/10

Rush –the world’s most famous cult band — brought their Time Machine Tour to the Shoreline Amphitheatre in Mountain View, CA for a marathon set (or should I say, two sets) of old and new songs that spanned their 30+ year career.  I’ll say one thing for Rush: in this era of evaporating disposable incomes, Rush gives their fans their money’s worth.  Now, even in more economic flush times, the band has been performing three hour sets, but this show seemed like the group really rolled out all the bells, whistles, smoke and lights to enhance their music.  Not that the group really needs all the extra flourishes, since their music is pretty dynamic to begin with, but while the production values aren’t quite at KISS levels, they are impressive for Rush. Before getting to the music, I have to mention the stage show.  The boys have always been a goofy lot, but their comedic skills were on full display with three short films that were placed at the beginning, middle and end of the …

50Prog50: The Best Prog Albums, Part Four

Regrets, I’ve had a few. There were bands and artists I really wanted to squeeze onto this list but, ultimately, the fit wasn’t right. Queen certainly had the originality that progressive rock requires and their pomp-righteous first couple albums might have accepted the shoehorn, but it never fully jibed. Queen is, at heart, one of the great hard rock bands and if the readership demands it be so, they’ll rank high on 50Hard Rock50. Supertramp started its tumultuous life as a prog band, the brainchild of Rick Davies, but when Roger Hodgson signed on a couple years later, a lot of those tendencies arrived only in flashes. I would have chosen the classic Breakfast In America, but I’ve already stretched the boundaries as far as my inclusive viewpoint is concerned. Styx was considered prog, but not their “classic” years, and their one honest-to-goodness rock opera, Kilroy Was Here, mostly burns horribly like hot sauce dumped in your ear canals. I stand by my opinion that Paradise Theater is not as bad as you might think …