All posts tagged: Talking Heads

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The World’s Worst Music Snob Can’t Get Laid

I can rarely predict where a column about music is going to raise my ire next. I’ve all-but stopped reading Lefsetz recently in the name of self-preservation, and on those rare moments when I bothered to open his e-mails I’ve simply laughed at the awfulness of the first few paragraphs before deleting. Fortunately, there is my sister, who is usually awesome and I love her dearly. But right now she’s dead to me. Yesterday, she tipped me on to a column that’s appearing in today’s New York Times Magazine. She tagged me in the Comments section of its Facebook post without any explanation, so I’ll assume she thought, “Oh, here’s an article written by a music fan. Dave will like this.” It’s called “Streaming Music Has Left Me Adrift” by Dan Brooks and it’s…wow, I can’t even describe it. After reading half of it, I was hoping it would be ignored, but then Duquette tweeted it out, and Annie responded by asking if it was a joke. So here I am. Let’s begin. It’s hard to …

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The POPDOSE Premiere: Get Luckier, Get Looser with Qiet’s “Get Found”

As a budding music blogger (is it too pretentious to call myself a journalist?) I would love to become the industry’s go-to guy for fancy pants premieres and coveted exclusives. But once something goes live on the Internets, what’s the difference between being first and 5000’th to post a hot track? All that matters is the music, and nothing is hotter in my ear holes this week than a quite awesome outfit named Qiet. And POPDOSE has got the premiere of their new track right here yo! We are officially ballerz. Straight outta Charleston (West Virginia), Qiet  — hot damn it’s hard to type their name without adding a “u” after “q” — hell, I’m not even sure if it’s legal not to do so — gives the likes of Gogol Bordello, the Heavy, the Flaming Lips, the Bogmen and Talking Heads a run for their money. Huge horns, sharp lyrics, wry stories, voices chiming in from every corner of the mix, big guitars, kitchen sinks — you name it, it’s in there. ‘Get Found’ is the second track …

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Punk: A Braindump

You know the rest of the Twenty-Teens will be a hard slog when even the quality of our rebellion is mediocre. Look at the so-called “rebels” in today’s pop culture and what you really see are an endless stream of media frenemies, declaring their disdain for any number of departments while alternately being the exemplars of the same. In every sense, they ridicule the “cool kids” while concurrently emulating them…all “beef” and no balls, some might say. Not that this is such a new occurrence — human beings in general have gotten their “hate on” mostly out of envy, acted out as a duplication of the subject of note, not a departure from it. In terms of being content providers, previous generations at least tried to do it with some style. Their raised middle fingers weren’t crossed. Their anger wasn’t supposed to be empowerment, it was supposed to be anger. In the 1970s, in both the U.S. and the U.K. there was plenty to be angry about. Over there, the very real sense of class …

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10 Movies…Directed By Rock and Pop Stars (To Prepare You for Rob Zombie’s ‘The Lords of Salem’)

Lots of musicians decide they are famous and attractive enough to act, but it takes a special kind of hubris to take a break from making music to direct a movie. Sometimes it works out, as with the fruitful horror filmmaking career of Rob Zombie, whose The Lords of Salem comes out this week. Here are some others who gave it a shot. The Education of Charlie Banks The guy who got an Oscar nomination for The Social Network was once directed by Fred Durst, the guy who wrote the line “gimme somethin’ to break / how ‘bout your fuckin’ face.” But he does know what it’s like to be a violent thug, so there’s that. Yentl Streisand has one of the greatest voices ever, and she’s a good actress, too. And then there’s this literal vanity project, in which the 41-year-old Streisand directs her own performance as a teenager, who disguises herself as a boy to attend a yeshiva. Falling From Grace Ol’ John Cougar made himself up a movie-film real good like, with …

Mix Six: “The Other ’70s”

DOWNLOAD THE FULL MIX HERE Quick!  Without looking at the list of artists below, what do you think of when you think of the ’70s?  Did you think of disco?  Maybe. What about arena rock? Perhaps.  The folk stuff from the early ’70s?  It’s possible.  British punk rock?  Could be.  Well, those categories quite possibly cover the major musical genres that dominated the “Me decade.”  But between the crevices and in the margins of the dominant genres were other artists who would later become associated with New Wave music, heralded as pioneers of electronica, or even New Age.  So let’s jettison our preconceptions of the ’70s and get ready for some uncommon sounds from a decade that gave us the end of the U.S. involvement in Vietnam, the end of Richard Nixon, and the (temporary) death of disco. “Running Out of Angels,” Elvis Costello (Download) Sure, Elvis Costello is an icon now, but back in the ’70s he was this little dorky looking Buddy Holly spastic goof who wrote some solid pop songs that wouldn’t …

Basement Songs: Shawn Colvin, “This Must Be the Place (Naive Melody)”

Pete’s Café and Bar is located on the corner of 4th and Main in the heart of downtown Los Angeles. It’s a trendy restaurant with nice large windows that look out on the street, reasonable prices, and good food. Although I’d never been to Pete’s, it was the ideal meeting place to see my friend Brett, as it’s centrally located between my work and the Long Beach hotel where Brett was staying. I must admit that I was slightly reluctant to make the drive, at the end of a Tuesday that saw some of the nastiest storms Southern California had been hit with in years. Despite what Google maps claims, I knew that with traffic my drive wasn’t going to last a mere 45 minutes. My past experiences had taught me that I was looking at a good hour, and that wasn’t factoring in the weather conditions. Still, I didn’t want to pass up an opportunity to see Brett, even if it meant spending a couple hours in my car. At least I would have my iPod …

The Friday Mixtape: 9/25/09

Feel that tension building in your neck, that stress in the spinal cord that feels just like a piece of rope with the twine extra-wrapped? Feel that chafe of fraying fibers, rest to snap inside there? Let it go, man. Just let it go. You’ll feel all the better for it. Candlebox – 10000 Horses from Happy Pills (1998) David Bowie – It Aint Easy from The Rise And Fall Of Ziggy Stardust (1972) Dead Sea Effect – Battlefield I-5 North Commute from Those Of Us About To Die Salute You (2008) Great Buildings – Heartbreak from Apart from the Crowd (1981) Michael Knott – Cool from Fluid (1995) Pete Townshend – White City Fighting from White City (1985) Sepultura – Roots Bloody Roots from Roots (1996) Spy Glass Blue – Ignorant Side from Shadows (1997) Starflyer 59 – Your Company from Leave Here a Stranger (2001) Talking Heads – The Lady Dont Mind from Little Creatures (1985) Truck – Coffee In Church from 4X4X4 (2003) Undercover – The Eyes Of Love from Balance of …

Live Music: David Byrne @ Prospect Park Bandshell in Brooklyn, 6/8/09

An overwhelming 27,000 people showed up to see David Byrne play a free show at the Prospect Park Bandshell in Brooklyn on Monday night. The show was the opening of the 2009 Celebrate Brooklyn concert series. Celebration was easily the theme of the night, whether you were celebrating the fact that it didn’t rain, the fact that you managed to actually get inside the bandshell (many were detoured by the long, snake-like line, which purportedly began just before 11am), or the fact that you were seeing a legendary performer for free (or the cost of your donation). The show’s focus was Byrne’s work with Eno, covering the Talking Heads’ three pivotal, mid-career albums, and their two collab LPs, 1981’s My Life in the Bush of Ghosts, and last year’s Everything That Happens Will Happen Today, with the latter release unsurprisingly taking the most focus. (Which explains the absence of hits like “Psycho Killer,” “And She Was,” and “Road To Nowhere.”) Still, Byrne brought out some of the bigger Talking Heads players, all of which got …

CD Review: Doves, “Kingdom of Rust”

When I first heard that the new Doves album, Kingdom Of Rust, hearkened more toward their first album, Lost Souls (2000), than their most recent, Some Cities, even though that album is now four years old and strains the definition of “recent,” I worried a bit. I liked Lost Souls, but was very impressed by the directness of Some Cities, both in the songwriting and in the band’s seemingly newfound restraint in the fields of reverb and feedback. The latter seemed to find new ground for the group, versus the by-now-rote Radiohead-meets-shoegazing sound. Four years is a long time to retreat. It is with great relief, then, that I say that not only is Kingdom Of Rust its own creature, but that the band has found a comfortable common ground between both their phases. The opener, “Jetstream,” finds the band adopting an electro-chug and guitarist/vocalist Andy Williams slipping into a vocal sound easily mistaken for Tears for Fears’ Curt Smith. It’s a shocking start, but a good one because it absolutely indicates you’re not getting …

Dw. Dunphy On… Darn Floor Big Bite

Have you read the entertainment news today? Oh boy. A particularly dreadful tune is set to break some major records for sales, this week’s new movies arriving under a mantle of critical kudos have been trounced at the box office by The Dark Knight, a four-week winner no less, and the spate of mind-numbing reality TV shows, once considered dead in the water by pundits, are not only thriving but multiplying for the 2008/2009 season. It is, as the critics have feared, the grim realization that they have zero effect on the zeitgeist. But then again, we always knew that. The few critics that actually heard Darn Floor Big Bite, the 1987 release by the band Daniel Amos, were flabbergasted. They praised the textured, atmospheric guitar work as a revelation in contrast to the band’s keyboard-driven previous releases, Vox Humana and Fearful Symmetry. They were keen on the balancing act singer/writer Terry Scott Taylor had struck lyrically, still as literate and mature as before but not as heavy-handed. In a time where guitar groups were …

The Popdose Guide to Material Issue

The Beginning Mike Zelenko (drummer): “I met Jim through an advertisement in the Illinois Entertainer (a local monthly music magazine) right out of high school. He called me a couple days after the ad started running and told me to come out to Addison, IL (where he lived) right now. With him still on the phone, I’m asking my mom if I can I borrow a car. ‘I thought you were gonna mow the lawn,’ she says. In my other ear, I hear Jim saying, ‘Tell her that if you can’t borrow the car tonight, you’ll never mow another lawn.’ What impressed me the most about Jim was the fact that he was always thinking about the band in the future, planning 3 steps ahead. Forward progress was always being made. We had a very D.I.Y. ethic, were getting college play, and were willing to work harder than other bands. We made sure to hit New York at least once a month.” Ted Ansani (bassist): “Jim and I were friends at Columbia College and one …