All posts tagged: Teddy Pendergrass

Soul Serenade: Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes, “Wake Up Everybody”

Last weekend I attended a Triple-A radio conference in Philadelphia. The event is called Non-Comm (as in noncommercial radio), and I’ll be writing more about it soon. One of the highlights of the conference, which blends live music with industry panels, was the appearance of John Legend, performing with the Roots. The hometown heroes played a stunning set. Of special interest to me was a cover of the song “Wake Up Everybody,” which was originally recorded in 1975 by Philly soul legends Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes. The group had a secret weapon, but he didn’t remain secret for very long. He, of course, was Teddy Pendergrass, a truly great soul singer who was the Blue Notes’ lead vocalist during their most successful years at Philadelphia International Records. With Pendergrass up front, the group had hits like the immortal “If You Don’t Know Me by Now” (1972), “The Love I Lost” (1973), “Don’t Leave Me This Way” (1975), and “Bad Luck” (1975). The socially conscious “Wake Up Everybody” was written by Victor Carstarphen, Gene …

Bootleg City: Mayor to Mayor

The mayor of Bootleg City is back! And in case you have no idea who that is, the mayor is me! Thank you, thank you, you’re too kind. But if it’s not too much of a bother, please turn down the crickets — I’m having trouble hearing your applause. I originally planned to be on vacation for two months. Not long enough, if you ask me, but sometimes you have to make difficult sacrifices for your constituents. Then I remembered that I said I’d be spending the first 100 days of my second term far away from this godforsaken open sore of a town. (Those of you who didn’t vote for me wanted “the next mayor” to be honest, remember? Well, look who’s next, suckas.) A hundred days is more than three months, not two, so I shouldn’t even be here right now, except maybe to dump more snow in Matt Wardlaw’s driveway. I should be relaxing on the beach, or reading on the couch, or signing up for a remedial math class.

The Popdose Podcast: Episode 4

Don’t know what to get your friends and loved ones for the holidays this year? If they’re lovers of merriment, obnoxious humor and immature behavior, we can think of no better gift than The Popdose Podcast, Episode 4! Sure, it doesn’t cost anything to give as a gift, but that just leaves you more money to spend on yourself this season. Because let’s face it — you’re worth it. In this episode, our illustrious hosts discuss — you guessed it — the holiday season, from gifts to music and everything in between. You’ll also find out exactly how Cabbage Patch Kids are born. We only wish we were making this up. Please leave us your thoughts in the comments, and if you like the show, please leave a review on iTunes. Enjoy! The Popdose Podcast, Episode 4: Cabbage Section (1:01:45, 70.7 MB), featuring Jeff Giles, Jason Hare, and Dave Lifton. Download from You can also subscribe to the podcast’s RSS feed. Show Notes 0:00 Intro, leading into a varied holiday discussion. We start by discussing …

CD Review: The Revelations featuring Tre Williams, “The Bleeding Edge”

Last year, the Revelations featuring Tre Williams released their Deep Soul EP, which was not only one of my favorite recordings of the year, but one that I voted for in the upcoming “Top Albums of the Decade” feature here at Popdose. For their debut full-length album, The Bleeding Edge (Decision Records / Traffic Entertainment), the Revelations have added an additional eight songs to the EP’s seven. Let me get this out of the way here, because if it’s true for the Avett Brothers, it’s true for the Revelations. Fifteen songs is too many for an album. The original seven were great. Three or four more would have been perfect for the album. As it is, not all of the new songs rise to the level of those on the EP, and a nearly perfect soul album could have been gleaned from a more judicious selection of songs. I intend to keep fighting this fight against extreme album length, so I hope you’ll give me some room on this. Tre Williams is a force of …

Chartburn: 2/29/08

Mainstream Rock: INXS, “Suicide Blonde” (1990) John: I was always appreciative of INXS for holding X back until 1990 so I could accurately say their best stuff was back in the ’80s. There are currently 272 used copies of X available on Amazon for one cent each. Vrabel: Was this the period when INXS was dropping, like, four albums a year? I seem to remember them having a fairly ludicrous output around this time. Not a bad song, I guess. Was X the album that had “Not Enough Time”? That’s not a bad song either, I guess. David: “Not Enough Time” was on Welcome to Wherever You Are, which was a pretty damned underrated album. Few people loved INXS as much as I did in the ’80s, but “Suicide Blonde” just felt off to me. Every record up to that point was an expansion on the previous one, but X marked the first time that the band just tried to repeat the previous album. Loved the second single, “Disappear,” …