All posts tagged: Terry Scott Taylor

50CCM50, Part Three

Well, this is getting to be a pretty lousy habit, now isn’t it? Coming into the middle part of December, I had severe computer and Internet connectivity problems, my car’s radiator was leaking severely, my dog ate my homework, I ran out of gas, I, I had a flat tire, I didn’t have enough money for cab fare, my tux didn’t come back from the cleaners, an old friend came in from out of town, someone stole my car, there was an earthquake! A terrible flood! Locusts! IT WASN’T MY FAULT!! (Stay tuned for a very special Consumerism column where I go into detail about the one in that list that’s the real problem, and the other that’s becoming so.) At any rate, There is something that needs to be addressed here, and that is the list of albums that nearly made it, but not quite. If the list was 75 items long, they’d surely be here but, for one reason or another, I couldn’t quite fit them in. Daniel Amos – Darn Floor Big …

CD Review: The Lost Dogs, “Old Angel”

We’re lucky to have the Lost Dogs, and for any number of reasons. Comprised of Terry Scott Taylor, Michael Roe, Derri Daugherty and now Daugherty’s bandmate from the Choir, Steve Hindalong, the band is a super-group without, by and large, their day-jobs. Taylor and Roe revisit their bands Daniel Amos and The Seventy Sevens so infrequently that the Dogs could easily be considered their main gig. The Choir is releasing a new album this year, but you simply can’t expect a yearly release from them anymore. And yet, most of their former contemporaries hung their guitars on the wall-forks a long time ago. Those that have continued find themselves marginalized, sequestered to self-released projects that arrive and depart with no fanfare. Moreover, since the death of original fourth Dog Gene Eugene, the band has put out album after album of quality music that still felt slightly traumatized. CDs like Real Men Cry and Nazarene Crying Towel come across as these beautiful but mournful documents of a family after a tragedy. Hindalong’s entry to the group …

The Friday Mixtape: 7/24/09

The more things change… Adam Again – Ain’t No Sunshine from Ten Songs by Adam Again (1988) Deliverance – Beauty And The Beast from Camelot in Smithereens (1995) Jacob’s Trouble – Tell Me What You See from Door Into Summer (1989) Lost Dogs – I’m A Loser from Little Red Riding Hood (1993) Mortal – Nowhere Man from Wake (1994) Passafist – Street Fighting Man from Passafist (1994) Phil Keaggy – When Will I Ever Learn To Live In God from Crimson and Blue (1993) Rez – Presence Of The Lord from Silence Screams (1988) Terry Scott Taylor – Long, Long, Long from A Briefing For The Ascent (1987) The 77s – Over, Under, Sideways, Down from 88 (1991) The Choir – Behind That Locked Door from Wide-Eyed Wonder (1989) This Train – Baby Baby from You’re Soaking In It (1995) You can download art for this mixtape here…

The Friday Mixtape: 5/15/09

I said I wouldn’t do it. I was called out, however, and if there’s one thing I’m not, that’s a punk. All my neon green hair fell out a long time ago. —Dw. Ben Lee – Catch My Disease from Awake Is the New Sleep (2005) Bleu – Could Be Worse from Redhead (2003) Calexico – Ballad of Cable Hogue from Hot Rail (2000) Devo – Devo Has Feelings Too from Smooth Noodle Maps (1990) Fischerspooner – Never Win from Odyssey (2005) Jethro Tull – Wond’ring Aloud from Aqualung (1971) Kino – Holding On from Picture (2005) Otis Redding – My Girl from Otis Blue: Otis Redding Sings Soul (1965) Robert Vaughn & the Shadows – Love Came Falling from Love and War (1985) RPWL featuring Ray Wilson – Roses from Live: Start the Fire (2005) Sean Watkins – Summer’s Coming from Blinders On (2006) Spoon – The Fitted Shirt from Girls Can Tell (2001) Super Furry Animals – Lazer Beam from Love Kraft (2005) Tammy Faye Bakker – The Ballad of Jim and Tammy …

Dw. Dunphy On… Darn Floor Big Bite

Have you read the entertainment news today? Oh boy. A particularly dreadful tune is set to break some major records for sales, this week’s new movies arriving under a mantle of critical kudos have been trounced at the box office by The Dark Knight, a four-week winner no less, and the spate of mind-numbing reality TV shows, once considered dead in the water by pundits, are not only thriving but multiplying for the 2008/2009 season. It is, as the critics have feared, the grim realization that they have zero effect on the zeitgeist. But then again, we always knew that. The few critics that actually heard Darn Floor Big Bite, the 1987 release by the band Daniel Amos, were flabbergasted. They praised the textured, atmospheric guitar work as a revelation in contrast to the band’s keyboard-driven previous releases, Vox Humana and Fearful Symmetry. They were keen on the balancing act singer/writer Terry Scott Taylor had struck lyrically, still as literate and mature as before but not as heavy-handed. In a time where guitar groups were …