All posts tagged: The Beatles

overgrowth

5 Songs That Inspired the Otherworldly Talent of Robert Nix

“No, I won’t go with the flow, because if I do, I’ll end up where everybody else goes.” Those are probably the most descriptive and autobiographical words taken straight from Robert Nix’s lead single, “Won’t Go With the Flow” from his new album, Blue Moon. Self admittedly inspired by music from a plethora of eras and venues, he’s created a subgenere all his own, with a blend of rock, New Wave, indie, and a bit of psychedelia all his own. (If you with Talking Heads would have collaborated with early Syd Barrett, you’re in luck.) We were dying to find out more about how Nix invented his infectious sound, so we asked him for five influential songs that inspired him. Here’s what he said. 1. “Magical Mystery Tour,” The Beatles The energetic opener to the Beatles’ psychedelic masterpiece of an album and probably some of the first music I ever heard courtesy of my sister’s vinyl record. This album in particular made its way into my bloodstream — I never did get off that bus, it seems. 2. “Strange Days,” …

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DVD & CD REVIEW: THE BEATLES, “1+”

Objectivity be damned; this is The Beatles we’re talking about.  The single, most important cultural entity to happen in my lifetime; merely a rock and roll band who re-shaped traditions – musically and on a grander, far deeper social scale.  But not to quickly digress, they also made the most memorable and beloved music in modern history.  Two of them are now dead and they continue to live on as new, younger generations are finding them/finding out about them and how crucial they were and are, most importantly, musically. So here’s another repacking with a neat addition.  The stripped down and wildly successful 1 collection (originally released in 2000) has now been remastered and reissued with a restored DVD/Bluray set of the band’s promo films – some actually shot when the Fabs were a going entity – to create 1+.  The pictures are sharper than before; the sound is dynamic and, of course, the music is just as thrilling now as it was then. From the CD edition, you get all the singles that reached …

The Zombies

A Fan’s Notes: The Colin Blunstone Interview

The Zombies were the second English group to have a #1 single in the US, trailing only the Beatles for that distinction, when their 1964 debut single “She’s Not There” reached the top of the Cashbox chart in this country. Now, more than 50 years later, the Zombies are still going strong. Their latest album, Still Got That Hunger, will be released on October 9. On September 30 the band will embark on their latest US tour. In recent years lead singer Colin Blunstone and keyboard player Rod Argent, both founding members of the Zombies, have been touring with a band that includes bass player Jim Rodford (formerly of Argent, and the Kinks), Rodford’s son Steve on drums, and guitar player Tom Toomey. The upcoming tour will be special in that the band will be playing their fabled 1968 album Odessey & Oracle in its entirety for the first time in the US, and they will be doing it with original Zombies drummer Hugh Grundy, and songwriter/bass player Chris White who joined the band in …

george-harrison

CD BOXSET REVIEW: GEORGE HARRISON, “The Apple Years 1968 – 75”

The perfect companion piece – the sensible companion piece to the earlier The Dark Horse Years 1976 – 1992.  This beautifully styled 6 CD plus DVD and hardcover book set brings together all of the late guitarist’s earlier output – most notably, the long and often-forgotten Wonderwall Music (soundtrack music) and Electronic Sound (Moog synthesizer experimentation), both of which had been deleted and unavailable as quickly as they’d been released. The Apple Years 1968 – 75 includes George’s 1970 masterpiece All Things Must Pass (now in its original black and white sleeve); the equally high-quality Living In The Material World, 1974’s Dark Horse and the final “new” album Apple Records issued in 1975, Extra Texture. While All Things Must Pass receives most of the attention for its three albums (2 CD’s) of George being “free from The Beatles”, filled with top notch songs/songwriting, there are some very high points to the other albums.  Certainly, the worldwide hit single “Give Me Love (Give Me Peace On Earth)” from Living In The Material World has to take …

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BOOK REVIEW: Candy Leonard, “Beatleness”

For once, a book about The Beatles that differs – to me – from the ones that have gone before.  Beatleness, by Dr. Candy Leonard, is a look at the meaning of The Beatles to the “first generation” who experienced The Beatles from their initial landing on the American shores in February, 1964.  Told through numerous perspectives, it traces the five year journey of these fans along with The Beatles from their debut, their progression and their end in May, 1970. Often, books about The Beatles are heaped with praise and empty hyperbole or rehash stories you’ve heard a million times before.  This book is not like that, which makes it a worthwhile and deeply interesting read.  For me, the striking statements are those which criticize the band during their more adventurous phases (Revolver, “Strawberry Fields Forever”, etc.) – some fans felt the band was getting  strange or weird; some were alienated by these less-than-squeaky clean Moptops – some switched allegiances to other bands of the day (The Monkees, being the most notable – and …

The Paul & John - Inner Sunset

ALBUM REVIEW: The Paul & John – Inner Sunset

With a name that knowingly evokes the Beatles and the pinnacle of pop songwriting, The Paul & John set expectations sky-high for their debut album. In Inner Sunset, the fruit of a collaboration between Paul Myers (The Gravelberrys, Flam!, A Wizard A True Star—Todd Rundgren in the Studio) and John Moremen (The Orange Peels, Half Japanese, Roy Loney), they have simply delivered one of the best guitar pop half-hours of 2014. Myers and Moremen, who play every note on the album and share vocal duties, show themselves to be accomplished songwriters  and expert arrangers throughout Inner Sunset, building each song on a foundation of sturdy hooks and memorable moments (the handclaps on the bridge of “Hungry Little Monkey”, the superb duelling guitars on “When I Lost My Way”), pristine harmonies, and clever wordplay (“’77 and the punk rock summer/I was just another of the wannabe Strummers”). While there are echoes of Wilco’s sun-bleached pop circa Summerteeth, Matthew Sweet’s Girlfriend, the Wondermints’ Bali and Cotton Mather’s masterful Kon Tiki—and the album will certainly appeal to fans of all four—The Paul & John’s Inner Sunset has a unique spiritual …