All posts tagged: The Fixx

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Like, Omigod! Digging Through the ’80s Pop Culture Box, Part 15

Having passed the halfway mark on Disc Four, we’re officially into the back half of the series — though still in the front half of the decade… #11 Big Country, “In a Big Country” (1983) Peaked at #17 in the Hot 100. Reached #3 in Canada, a bigger country than the US. Jon Cummings – I guess we’re all supposed to defer to Mr. Giles here, so I’ll just say, man, we thought those bagpipe guitars were cool. Shah! Jack Feerick – Jesus, take the wheel; I can’t even pretend to be objective about these guys. Big Country may not have been an important band per se, but they were important to me. They made two-and-a-half genuinely great albums, and even if their drop-off was quick and steep, I will always give them a pass for that. They weren’t afraid of uplift, they weren’t afraid of optimism, and they gave me strength during some times in my life when I needed strength. Our own Mike Duquette makes the case better than ever I could. That …

Bottom Feeders: The Rock End of the ’80s, Part 16

We move on this week to the sixth letter of the alphabet and look at more tunes that hit the Billboard rock charts in the 1980s but failed to cross over into the Hot 100. The Fabulous Thunderbirds “Tip On In” 1981, #44 (download) “One’s Too Many (and A Hundred Ain’t Enough)” 1981, #41 (download) “Look At That, Look At That” 1986, #20 (download) “How Do You Spell Love” 1987, #22 (download) “Rock This Place” 1989, #10 (download) One of my favorite underrated groups of the ‘80s, most people know them for the excellent “Tuff Enuff” which pushed them to mainstream radio, but before that they were pretty straightforward blues rock and I’d bet a hell of a fun bar band. Their first album to give them hits was Butt Rockin’ from 1981 which contained the blues cover “Tip On In” and “One’s Too Many” co-written by singer Kim Wilson and Nick Lowe. Fast forward five years to the Tuff Enuff album where they added a pop edge into the blues to create killer numbers …

Lost in the ’80s: The Fixx, “Deeper and Deeper”

The most rock-radio acceptable of the new-wave acts (with the possible exception of the Cars and the Police), the Fixx were always unfairly slammed as a producer’s band, the mere playthings of Rupert Hine, who buffed their angular, jagged sound to an airwaves-friendly sheen. I never quite understood how this was considered an insult — why should the Fixx feel slighted because they found a great producer who knew what to do with them? Isn’t that the point of a producer? By 1984 the partnership had borne two gold albums, one platinum album, three Top 40 hits, and a few AOR staples. In fact the Fixx and Hine were producing material at such a quick clip that one of their better songs ended up as a cut on the Streets of Fire soundtrack (which was discussed here) as well as the B-side on Phantoms’s first single, “Are We Ourselves?” “Deeper and Deeper” was an oddity on that 1984 film’s soundtrack alongside overwrought Jim Steinman productions and Dan Hartman’s schlocky “I Can Dream About You.” A …

Popdose Flashback: Rush, “Presto”

It wasn’t their best album. It wasn’t even much like what people consider their best album. Yet the mighty Canadian power trio Rush found themselves on Atlantic Records with a producer known mostly for working with The Fixx and Tina Turner. It was in many ways a fresh start and, true to the band’s nature, they made the most of it. Lyricist/drummer Neil Peart always had a knack for wordplay, but quite often that was the lyrical crux of the song, with no specific aim attached. On Presto, the seeds of his political nature were finally starting to bloom. “War Paint” fleshes out the angst of teenage life in a hostile adult world, a direct graduation from “Subdivisions.” The very specific “Red Tide” spurs on an ecology-mindedness the listener kind of knew was there but couldn’t precisely summarize. The kickoff “Show Don’t Tell” went to number #1 on the rock charts. Perhaps it was producer Rupert Hine’s pop polish that made everything so much more palatable than their hard-rock roots, but this is exactly what …

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Bottom Feeders: The Ass End of the ’80s, Part 31

New baby = less time. Imagine that. I was somehow under the impression that sleepless nights were going to give me plenty of free time to continue to write meaningless drivel in my intros, but I haven’t been able to find the motivation at 3 AM just yet. So, in an effort to continue to give you the “quality” music of Bottom Feeders without interruption, I’m going to move straight to the music for the remainder of 2008. Without further ado, we continue looking at the ass end of the Billboard Hot 100 in the ’80s, with more artists whose names begin with the letter F. Fiona “Talk to Me” — 1985, #64 (download) “Everything You Do (You’re Sexing Me)” — 1989, #52 (download) Fiona Flanagan is less known for her music than for her lead role in the failed 1987 Bob Dylan movie Hearts of Fire. “Everything You Do” is a duet with Bottom Feeders favorite Kip Winger! If I could choose one artist to be the spokesperson for this series, Kip would be …