All posts tagged: Will Smith

10 Movies…That Had Better Titles In Pre-Production (Like ‘The To Do List’ Had)

A lot can happen from the time a script is turned in to a studio to the time the film actually goes into production. Actors are cast and then recast, shooting locations may change, the script gets rewritten a bunch of times, and even the name of the damn movie might end up getting tweaked. Such is the case with this week’s The To Do List, which, subtly and playfully gets across the point that the movie is about a girl racking up sexual experiences before she leaves for college…but it’s not nearly as raunchy, or absolutely unmarketable, as the original title, The Hand Job. Here are ten other movies that chickened out and went bland and familiar instead of evocative and bonkers. Last Action Hero This ultra-meta parody of extremely violent action movies was supposed to be called…Extremely Violent. Scream This ultra-meta parody of scary movies was supposed to be called…Scary Movie. (That title was then, ironically, used for a series of horror movie parody films.) The Texas Chainsaw Massacre Yeah, The Texas Chainsaw …

conjuring

10 Movies…That Are, Surprisingly, Based on True Stories (Like ‘The Conjuring’)

This week the “found footage”-style horror movie fades briefly and unexpectedly into oblivion like a spooky ghost girl in favor of The Conjuring, a horror movie with a traditional narrative form. Those found footage movies work so well because they introduce an extra, meta level of fear – this shit isn’t a movie…it’s real! And it looks real, because it looks like home video footage. The Conjuring, while a regular narrative-style film with a high budget and known actors like Vera Farmiga and Lili Taylor, also boasts that real-life fear factor, as it is based on the accounts of the Peron family, who hired paranormal investigators to check out their supposedly haunted Rhode Island farmhouse. Believe of that what you will. But here are 10 other movies that, believe it or not, are also based on true stories…extensive artistic license notwithstanding. Up Close and Personal Joan Didion and John Gregory Dunne, of all people, wrote the screenplay, using as their source the book Golden Girl, the sad and salacious biography of NBC News anchor Jessica …

Friday Night Videos!: The Hits of 1991

If you’re holding your breath for the day MTV starts playing music videos again, let it go. It’s never going to happen, and certainly not with that attitude, you young people! Oh, and Thanksgiving is over. Time to redo those pants back up, people. Nobody needs to see those flabtastic bags of poop-fixins just bulging out from behind your underpants. And I swear, the first one busts out a turkey fart is out of here! I mean it! But who needs MTV in the digital age? We’re here, the time’s right, and the videos are waiting for us. This week’s list was democratically determined by the Popdose Staff. The terms were simple. The songs that get the most votes get the spots, except for the #1 of the year. So set the way-way-back machine for 1990, rip those shirts, don’t wash your hair and think about your pants. Just think long and hard about those pants, yo. It’s time to rock. R.E.M. – Losing My Religion: Losing the opportunity to embed videos too, apparently. Watch …

Dw. Dunphy On… The Theater of Pain

I struggled to find a properly descriptive title for this week’s column and failed miserably. I’m actually referring to movies that beat up the main character so badly, for so long, in such depressing detail, that while the performances in the film may be extraordinary, one wonders if such subject matter could be portrayed any other way. I’m thinking about the movie Precious, in which young Gabbie Siddibe plays the title character, and said character is put through the wringer multiple times, hung out on the clothesline, beaten until dry, then chucked back into the choppy water again. Her character is the victim of multiple devils, including her drug-addicted hell-bitch of a mother, portrayed with teeth-gnashing intensity by comedian Mo’Nique, and multiple incidents of incest (and pregnancies). It is that last bit that, while horrific on its own, ultimately throws down the final insult to Precious and her harrowing life. I won’t spoil the plot any farther, but it should suffice to say that there is no tapping of ruby slippers at the end to …

Film Review: “The Day The Earth Stood Still”

Before we begin, allow me to state for the record that I hate remakes. With very rare exceptions, they tend to be lifeless, pale imitations of the classics which came before them. The remake of the 1951 classic The Day The Earth Stood Still does nothing to change my perceptions of Hollywood’s latest runaway trend. Set in New York instead of Washington D.C., the film focuses on the arrival of Klaatu (Keanu Reeves), an alien who comes to Earth with an ultimatum for mankind. Before he can even finish assembling his true form in front of an astonished gathered military force, a soldier shoots him, nearly killing him. He’s taken to a military academy for study, where one of the scientists allowed to observe him as he is operated upon and allowed to heal is astrobiologist Helen Benson (Jennifer Connelly). When Regina Jackson (Kathy Bates), the Secretary of Defense, arrives with agents in tow and declares that Klaatu is a prisoner of the government and is to be interrogated, Benson finds a measure of empathy …