All posts tagged: YouTube

Debbie Gibson

The Popdose Interview: Debbie Gibson

If you want to feel inspired, spend a few minutes talking with Debbie Gibson. Certainly, you’re probably aware of the chart success that Gibson enjoyed in the ‘80s, beginning with her first single “Only in My Dreams” in 1987, the first of five Top 40 singles that she would notch from her debut album Out Of The Blue. The first three singles from Out Of The Blue charted Top 5 and with her fourth single “Foolish Beat,” Gibson would become the youngest artist (at age 17) to ever write, produce and perform a Billboard #1 single, an accomplishment that remains unbeaten more than two decades later. Gibson faced challenges while working for the chance to record and release that first album and single, but she fought hard and the story of how Gibson stuck with the songs that she believed in — those very same songs that would be massive chart hits only a few years later, is a good one.

Fixing a Hole: The Beatles’ Imaginary Post-1970 Albums, Part 11

Part 11: Help Yourself (1993) I went through more iterations of this album than any other one in this series, but finally think I’ve got it as good as it’s going to get.  Some people may disagree with this hypothetical turn of events, but I think with the Beatles on top of the world again after Fab, combined with a vastly changing musical landscape, combined with the early ‘90s trend of cramming as much music onto a CD as humanly possible, this would’ve resulted in prime conditions for the Fab Four to get ambitious again. So if Fab is the late Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper, Help Yourself (named after Julian’s 1991 release) is the late Beatles’ White Album.  For the few and proud who were sticking with vinyl, this was a double album, so I will present it as four sides below.  But for everyone else, this was a single CD, jam-packed with 18 songs and 77 minutes of music.  Like the White Album, it would be lambasted upon initial release as being self-indulgent, excessive, and …

Film Review: Ian Dury Lives in “Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll”

In the United States, Ian Dury is a relatively obscure musical artist best known for his punk rock anthem, “Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll,” released in the late 70’s. However, in his homeland of England, Dury and his band, the Blockheads, were extremely successful, scoring a string of hit songs during the punk/new wave era. Andy Serkis is a relatively obscure English actor best known for providing the motion capture movements and the voice of Gollum in The Lord of the Rings trilogy. Redefining what motion capture can achieve, Serkis performance was so nuanced and dramatic that many critics felt he should have been recognized when end of the year awards were handed out.  These two artists converge in the new rock bio, Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll, a fantastic new film that covers Dury’s rise to stardom and the physical disability he had to overcome. Written by Paul Virach and directed by Mat Whitecross, Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll is a kindred spirit of Bob Fosse’s All That …

Film Review: A Unique and Darkly Animated World in “Metropia”

In the not too distant future, the earth is overpopulated and running out of oil. In Europe the underground train systems have been connected into one gigantic subway and run by a mega corporation. It’s a bleak world; very gray, where everyone, save for the obscenely rich, never manage a smile. Metropia is a unique animated film out of Sweden directed by Tarik Saleh, one that uses technology and the singular vision of the director to create a work of art with mixed results. In the film, Roger (voiced by Vincent Gallo), is an average worker from Stockholm. One morning he leaves his tiny, one-room apartment that he shares with his TV addicted girlfriend, and heads for work. On the way, he begins hearing a man’s voice in his head. It’s not a hallucination; Roger actually has someone speaking to him in his mind. How is that possible? Roger asks the voice these questions. The more questions Roger asks, the deeper he gets into a dark conspiracy and the terrifying secret that every aspect of …

Film Review: “The Infidel”

Only in indie cinema will you find a comedy about a burly, hairy English Muslim who explores his faith and personal identity after discovering that he’s actually a Jew. I can’t guarantee you’ll get more laughs from The Infidel than you would is you were to plop down twenty bucks to see Killers, because I haven’t seen that film; but I have faith that you’ll enjoy The Infidel much more. Omid Djalili stars as Mahmud Nasir, a loving husband, doting father and something of a “relaxed” practicing Musilim living in London. His son, Rashid (Amit Shah) is engaged to marry Uzma (Soraya Radford), whose stepfather is a fundamentalist/radical Muslim Arshad Al-Masri (Igal Naor). Apprehension fills the Nashir household as the whole family must receive the approval of Al-Mari in order for Rashid to be allowed to marry Uzma. Mahmud thinks it’ll be a piece of cake. Nothing is ever a piece of cake. While cleaning out the home of his recently deceased mother, Mahmud makes a shocking discovery. He was adopted. Even more shocking, and …

Numberscruncher: Viacom Sues YouTube

A video that always makes me happy, and violates Viacom’s copyright:

YouTube is taking another round of fire in the ongoing debate about intellectual property rights. Earlier this month, the court documents in an ongoing copyright infringement suit between YouTube and Viacom were released. Neither side looks good. The Google team apparently acknowledged that the reason for the site’s being was the distribution of pirated video. Viacom’s legal team wanted all of its content pulled, but enough folks at the company knew that there was publicity value to posting clips. Contractors from the company’s PR firms allegedly went to Kinko’s to post material to YouTube, in some cases after altering it to make it look amateur. After all, online video is a powerful form of promotion. It introduces people to new artists and new ideas that they might not find out about otherwise. (Gawker had a great piece on how people can learn about great rock artists from online video.) It boils down to this: Viacom’s management saw …

Dw. Dunphy On… The New Internet Superstar

I’ll cut to the chase. It’s Hitler. Adolf Hitler. Yeah, I’m rather shocked myself, but it seems like Herr Fuhrer is YouTube’s latest viral go-to guy. The new black is “reich,” as it were. If you have no clue, or you’re still digesting the last of Tay Zonday mania (remember him?), then you’ve been away from the Web for a long time. On the sliding scale of the Internet time-space continuum, a long time is equal to the distance between last Wednesday and the Wednesday previous to that multiplied by the rate of your Twitter tweeting frequency, wOOt, and ROFLMFAO, and cubed at the rate of EPIC FAIL. The specific scene used in these YouTube videos comes from a 2004 German film called Der Untergang, or Downfall, as it’s known in English-speaking countries. Hitler is portrayed by Bruno Ganz in a bit of foam-frothing scenery munching, and in the specifically co-opted scene, he’s being debriefed by his staff. Much to his chagrin, bad news has been delivered. He summons all but his inner circle to …

CD Review: Lelia Broussard, “Waiting on the 9”

Lelia Broussard – Waiting on the 9 (self-released, 2008) purchase this album (Amie Street) I’m pretty sure I have t-shirts that are older than Lelia Broussard, but even at the tender age of 20, she’s already got a few albums under her belt — none of which I’ve heard, mind you, but having listened to Broussard’s new six-song EP, Waiting on the 9, I’m smitten enough to seek them out. Broussard received her first major exposure thanks to Joan of Arcadia — the show featured her song “Secrets,” which she recorded when she was 14 — and her music has also appeared on The Hills, but she doesn’t have the wistful acoustic sound shared by most “as heard on TV” artists; her songs are rootsier, with slightly rougher edges, and unlike a lot of indie-pop singer/songwriters, she’s a singer as opposed to merely a vocalist. This distinction is made early on Waiting, with the subdued opening track, “Scared to Feel” — although it doesn’t contain many of the soul ingredients used on some of the …

No Concessions: “The Princess of Nebraska” Greets Her Public on YouTube

Necessity is the mother of invention. I just didn’t make it to the multiplex this week, but, fearing reprimand by my masters here at Popdose, figured I had to come up with something. Salvation arrived on Monday, via press release. “Wayne Wang’s The Princess of Nebraska Enjoys Record-Setting Debut on YouTube,” it read. “165,000+ views in a two-day period is the biggest online opening ever for a feature-length studio film.” My razor-sharp journalistic instincts sniffed a story, a thankfully easy-to-get story I could put together between diaper changes (my daughter’s, not my own). It got better: Beyond the headline, the release said that had the movie opened in theaters, it would have ranked No. 15 for the weekend, ahead of City of Ember, Religulous, and Lakeview Terrace. And, most important, it was free. Hell, yeah: I could sit in front of my MacBook and enjoy the 15th-ranked movie, for free (I wouldn’t pay 50 cents to watch City of Ember), pop out a few comments, and invite you to watch it, too, giving the whole …