The Friday Five: August 24, 2012

Written by Music, The Friday Five

It’s Friday, time to drop the needle on the record and shuffle away to the weekend.

The Friday Five

Friday Five : |ˈfrīdā – fīv| : On the sixth day of every week, I hit the shuffle button in iTunes and share the first five tracks and thought for each track. Sometimes there is a playlist involved, occasionally we’ll have a guest, but most of the time it’s just me. The rest is up to you, our friends and readers! Fire up the media player of your choice and share the first five random track of your shuffle in the comments.

The Five:

“Don’t Forget Me (When I’m Gone)” by Glass Tiger (from The Thin Red Line, 1986)

These guys did “Kyrie,” right? Oh, wait … that’s Bryan Adams, so it must be Glass Tiger. I can’t lie, I really enjoy not only this tune, but its follow up single, “Someday.” Hell, I like the whole record! Our friends over at The Second Disc reported yesterday that The Thin Red Line was recently reissued in a glorious two disc fashion, to about as much fanfare as the first time it was released. (That’s none, in case you were wondering.)

“The Outer Folds” by Throw Me the Statue (from Creaturesque, 2009)

This was a random purchase that paid off. I have absolutely no background information on these blokes, other than the fact that their breezy brit-inflected folk pop makes me twee with delight.

“Take a Photograph” by Dropping Daylight (from Brace Yourself, 2006)

Take one part Dashboard Confessional; one part 30 Seconds to Mars; one part Paramore; toss in a piano and shake vigorously and you will have yourself Dropping Daylight. While I enjoy a few of the tunes on the record, the piano is not an instrument that is well suited to emo.

“Raspberry Beret” by Dump (from That Skinny Motherfucker With the High Voice?, 2001)

Completely irreverent garage rock covers of Prince tunes? Hell. Yes. Dump is the nom de plume of Yo La Tengo bassist James McNew when he is away from the band. His use of a line from “Bob George,” a track from the much maligned Black Album, makes this even more essential.

“We Were Wealth” by Wye Oak (from Civilian, 2011)

I should have liked this record a whole lot more than I did. It has all the traits that generally send me over the moon, but the stars just did not align for this one.

What’s on your shuffle today?