David Wain isn’t as well known as some of his former cast mates from the comedy troupe, The State. While Ken Marino, Michael Ian Black, Kerri Kenney and Thomas Lennon have carved out nice careers for themselves as actors, Wain’s post State endeavors have been mostly behind the camera, as the director of the cult classic, Wet Hot American Summer, the hilarious Role Models, the upcoming Wanderlust (opening soon and starring Paul Rudd and Jennifer Aniston.) and his continued work on Adult Swim’s Children’s Hospital. Besides the short lived series, Stella, the best way to see Wain perform his subversive sense of humor is through his web-series, Wainy Days. The first four seasons of the show are now on DVD.

Produced exclusively for MyDamnChannel.com, Wainy Days is a fictionalized account of Shaker Heights, OH native Wain’s search for love in New York City. Each episode lasts about five minutes in length and without the constraints of network censors, Wain and his friends can get as raunchy and perverted as possible. Whether it’s fondling Elizabeth Banks or recounting ejaculating on his uncle’s back to another date (played by Rosemarie DeWitt), Wainy Days  can be shocking, hilarious and disgusting in a span of a minute. That Wain is able to lure so many well known friends into the mayhem is a tribute to the writer/actor’s talent. Besides most of his former co-stars from The State (which also include Michael Showalter and Joe Lo Truglio), other notables who took the time to appear on Wainy Days are Nick Offerman, Megan Mullaly, Janeane Garofalo, Ed Helms, Julie Bowen, Paul Rudd, Josh Charles and Callie Thorne, just to name a few.

If you’re a fan of the series and you’ve seen all 32 of the Webby Award winning series, you may be asking yourself why the hell you’d want to purchase the DVD when the eps are available for free on your computer. Well, I’m happy to say that Wain and company have provided loads of extras on the single DVD that will make it worth your while. Wain introduces each episode with various guests, all done in the guise of a slumber party. There are outtakes, a make-up megamix, a hilarious live reading of an episode that of Wainy Days that the actor wrote when he was twelve (not really) and Wains’ short film, Aisle Six. The latter was shot in the early 90’s and is an interesting document of the development of Wain and one of his earliest collaborations with some of the performers who would go on to form The State.