Popdose Roundtable: A Musical “Ghost” Haunts Broadway

Written by Popdose Roundtable, Theatre

There was no immediate warning about whether audience members in the first five rows might be spattered with stray bits of clay, but on Monday the producers of the musical version of “Ghost,” the supernatural romance that showed us how the living and the dead could collaborate around a pottery wheel, said it will come to Broadway in the spring.

Dw. Dunphy: Hit me back when we get to Porky’s: The Musical.

Jeff Giles: You know, I think that would be kind of fun.

Mike Duquette: Maybe I haven’t watched it in awhile, but I recall Ghost having some pretty ridiculous, sudden moments of violence that seemed tonally incorrect for your run-of-the-mill tearjerker romance. I can only imagine how they’ll adapt dudes getting hit by trucks and impaled by broken windows for the stage.

Matt Springer: When they get to the big “Unchained Melody” moment, they should know Bill Medley is VERY MUCH AVAILABLE, according to Wikipedia…

“Bill Medley currently performs at Dick Clark’s American Bandstand Theater in Branson, Missouri.”

He’d probably walk out and belt his biggest hit for three hot squares and a cot in his dressing room.

Jason Hare: I actually own the Ghost score on CD, and I have no idea why. Pretty sure it’s because my mother (like all of your mothers, don’t lie) loved that movie. It was a pretty worthless disc to a 13-year-old, until I figured out that one of the tracks was just, like, 19 seconds of a very low, ominous noise, punctuated by a scary-sounding orchestral attack on the 20th second. So I brought my four-year-old brother into my room, pressed “play,” stared at him ominously for 19 seconds, and then made this awful monster face right at the 20th second. He freaked the fuck out.

I am the best brother in the world.

Springer: I was about the same age, Jason, and just getting into music or whatever passed for it at that age. Cassingles were big and I was very excited to get the cassingle for “Unchained Melody.” Unfortunately, it was a Righteous Brothers “remake” of their own track, and not the original classic from the movie. I have very distinct memories of asking someone to play the tape while I was in the car with this girl I had a crush on, hoping the irresistible pull of the song would make her swoon, and then slowly realizing it was a shittier version of the actual song.

Dan Wiencek: Dude, when you’re in a car with a girl, you’re supposed to play side two of Led Zeppelin IV.

Enhanced by Zemanta