All posts tagged: Joan Baez

slouching

Popdose Conceptual Theater: Slouching Towards Bethlehem

This turned out a lot better than I expected. I’ve always had a weird sort of crush on Joan Didion – or at least the twentysomething ingenue she comes across as in her writing. My original intention was to use her novel “Democracy” as a source for this week’s Conceptual Theater Mixtape, but I don’t own a copy and couldn’t get one in time to put this together. Instead, I worked one of the few books that I bought in South Africa that was worthy of bringing home: a collection of her essays from the mid-sixties. I don’t imagine Joan Didion herself would care much for the music I’ve used here. Given her choices for titles (and subjects) I’m guessing she’d prefer folk music that would be more reminscent of the Haight-Ashbury scene she describes in the eponymous essay “Slouching Towards Bethlehem.” As you’ll see, I couldn’t resist using a few that would fit that pattern, but I’m hoping that the majority of songs here will be new to you. Popdose Conceptual Theater – Slouching …

human-highway

10 Movies…Directed By Rock and Pop Stars (To Prepare You for Rob Zombie’s ‘The Lords of Salem’)

Lots of musicians decide they are famous and attractive enough to act, but it takes a special kind of hubris to take a break from making music to direct a movie. Sometimes it works out, as with the fruitful horror filmmaking career of Rob Zombie, whose The Lords of Salem comes out this week. Here are some others who gave it a shot. The Education of Charlie Banks The guy who got an Oscar nomination for The Social Network was once directed by Fred Durst, the guy who wrote the line “gimme somethin’ to break / how ‘bout your fuckin’ face.” But he does know what it’s like to be a violent thug, so there’s that. Yentl Streisand has one of the greatest voices ever, and she’s a good actress, too. And then there’s this literal vanity project, in which the 41-year-old Streisand directs her own performance as a teenager, who disguises herself as a boy to attend a yeshiva. Falling From Grace Ol’ John Cougar made himself up a movie-film real good like, with …

CD Review: Indigo Girls, “Staring Down the Brilliant Dream”

As the story goes, the initial scene backstage at Lilith Fair in 1997 was a somewhat lonely one: many of the featured artists stayed in their individual dressing rooms with their respective bands until showtime. Until Indigo Girls showed up, that is, and began knocking on everyone’s doors, asking if anybody wanted to join them for any number of songs within their set. The atmosphere opened up and a community formed, and the duo fostered what can only be described as a hootenanny. This vibe seems to surround the Indigo Girls concert experience, both for artists and audience, and is plenty present on their new solid live release, Staring Down the Brilliant Dream. A two-disc set, Dream is the third live release in the Girls discography (preceded by 1991’s Back On the Bus, Y’all and 1995’s 1200 Curfews). While that may seem like at least one live album too many, Amy Ray and Emily Saliers have been so prolific since the release of the last one that there’s barely any overlap at all. And for …

Live Music: Folk Festival 50, Newport, R.I. (Day Two)

To be honest, I had my doubts about Day Two of Folk Festival 50. First of all, I was still tired from the day one. Next, it appeared that the lineup wasn’t quite as strong as it was on Saturday, and yet it was hard to deny that there were some compelling artists scheduled. The weather was also a bit iffy, with rain and thunderstorms predicted for the afternoon. Josh Ritter was the first performer on the Fort Stage on Sunday, and he was one of the prime reasons that I was at the festival. I’m a big fan of the Idaho songwriter, and his set did not disappoint. He appeared with his full band, and they sounded great on songs like “Right Moves,” and “Real Long Distance” from Josh’s most recent album, The Historical Conquests of Josh Ritter, and on the title track from his 2003 album Hello Starling. The real standout however, was one that Josh played solo, the beautiful and powerful anti-war song “Girl In the War.” He dedicated “Another New World” …

Jesus of Cool: DJ Pete Fornatale Takes Woodstock Nostalgists “Back to the Garden”

If you’ve visited your local Barnes & Noble or Borders lately, you may have noticed that Woodstock-related books have taken over display tables nationwide. Indeed, a cottage industry of tree-pulping has arisen to celebrate Woodstock’s 40th, ranging from photo-packed coffee-table extravaganzas to serious-minded tomes that feature (horrors!) no images of topless hippie chicks whatsoever. In the former category there’s Woodstock: Three Days that Rocked the World, a book the size of a small LP-record collection that was created with cooperation from the Museum at Bethel Woods; the scrapbook-formatted Woodstock: Peace, Music & Memories, assembled by two members of the Woodstock Preservation Alliance; and Woodstock Vision, a revised and extended compilation of two earlier collections by “official” festival photographer Elliott Landy. Among the more detailed histories, Michael Lang – one of the co-creators of Woodstock Ventures and a real force behind the festival – has penned The Road to Woodstock, which includes other organizers’ remembrances as well as his own. Then there’s Taking Woodstock, the book behind the film opening this weekend; its author, Elliot Tiber, …

DVD Review: “Woodstock: 3 Days of Peace and Music Director’s Cut”

There’s a well-known saying that if you think Woodstock was great, you weren’t there. The point is that the mud, drugs, lack of food and water, and often bad music made the whole thing a disaster for those who were there. I don’t know about where you live, but where I’m from in New Jersey, everyone of a certain age claims to have been there. I’ve even made that claim a couple of times. At least I was at the great, but now forgotten, Atlantic City Pop Festival two weeks earlier. If everyone who says they were there was actually there, there would have been millions of people rolling around in the mud, instead of the hundreds of thousands who were actually there. Jeff Giles reviewed the Blu-ray version of the new 40th Anniversary Edition Director’s Cut of the Woodstock film a couple of weeks ago. I haven’t read Jeff’s review because I make it a point not to read any reviews of something that I’m working on until after I’ve finished my review. So …