All posts tagged: Scarlett Johansson

'Ant-Man' stars ants, and Paul Rudd.

Farkakte Film Flashback: Buggy ‘Ant-Man’ Edition

I saw “Ant-Man” over the weekend, and given the fact that advance buzz (so to speak) was iffy, I was pleasantly surprised: It was the funniest Marvel movie yet, and it fully embraces its ludicrous premise (something about being able to make people shrink by “changing the distance between atoms,” a concept that only sounds even mildly reasonable because it’s uttered by Michael Douglas). But one of my favorite parts of the movie is its cast of supporting characters — no, not Michael Peña, although he is awesome. I’m talking about the ants, whom Ant-Man controls by harnessing the something in their whatsis … actually I don’t think they ever really explain how it works, but who cares? Unlike most movie bugs they’re a huge help to our hero, and one of them — SPOILER ALERT! — even gets a name (Antony) and a heroic demise. It also made me think of certain other, previous bug movies, some of which are definitely lesser than “Ant-Man,” but which all hold a space in the pantheon of creepy …

Don Jon

Blu-ray Review: “Don Jon”

Joseph Gordon-Levitt can proudly add another hyphenate to his name. As the writer-director (and star) of Don Jon, Gordon-Levitt shows great promise in both categories. The film takes on the cliched conventions of the modern day rom-com and has fun with them for a solid directorial debut and an accomplished piece of filmmaking. Gordon-Levitt stars as Jon, a New-York stud who only cares about certain things: His family, his pad, his wheels, his body, his buddies, his church, his girls (ie. getting laid) and his porn. Yes, his porn. Jon is your typical modern male (or so he thinks) who views online porn daily. In the photos and videos he surfs, Jon finds greater sexual satisfaction than any of the women he picks up from the clubs. He prefers the fantasy to the messiness and the conditions that come with a human sexual relationship. It’s not until he finds a flesh and blood woman he truly desires that Jon begins to realize that he has a porn addiction. That flesh and blood woman is Scarlett …

Now-You-See-Me-Gets-New-Poster-Plenty-of-Bad-Photoshop

10 Movies…About Magicians (To Prepare You For ‘Now You See Me’)

I’m not sure Now You See Me is a real movie—I’m pretty sure it’s part of the massive viral marketing campaign for last weekend’s huge Arrested Development revival. Evidence: it stars Michael Cera look-alike Jesse Eisenberg, new A.D. cast member Isla Fisher, and the plot concerns both the theft of money and cheesy, Vegas-style magic—I mean illusions. (“A trick is something a whore does for money. Or cocaine.” — GOB Bluth.) Here then are 10 certifiably real movies about magic anyway. The Incredible Burt Wonderstone If they’d made that Arrested Development movie, and it was solely about GOB and his rival magician, Tony Wonder, this would be that movie.   Scoop The ghost of a man played by a notable actor hamming it up (Ian McShane) helps a cute young girl (Scarlett Johansson) and her bumbling friend (Woody Allen) solve a mystery. Fun fact: Woody Allen wrote this in 1971 as a Scooby-Doo spec script.   Hugo It’s about movies, and magic…but really the “magic” of “movies.” Awww….   The Geisha Boy Jerry Lewis stars …

The Avengers

Watch the New “Avengers” Trailer

Well, you’ll still have to wait until next May to watch the whole thing, but Marvel is starting to get serious about sharing glimpses of Joss Whedon’s The Avengers. And not just the kinda boring stills they gave Entertainment Weekly a couple of weeks ago, either — now you’ve got a full-fledged trailer to feast your eyes on. Hail, hail, the gang’s all here: Iron Man (Robert Downey, Jr.), Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson), Thor (Chris Hemsworth), Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson), Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner), Captain America (Chris Evans), and even Bruce Banner, a.k.a. the Hulk (Mark Ruffalo). What brings them all together? Watch:

DVD Review: “Vicky Cristina Barcelona”

Vicky Cristina Barcelona (2008, The Weinstein Company) purchase this DVD (Amazon) Whatever your feelings about Woody Allen — and Lord knows I’ve had my ups and downs with his movies — it’s impossible to overestimate his influence on American comedy. It’s sort of ironic, because Allen isn’t always very funny, but his classic films proved that people will pay to watch characters do little other than talk about their problems — heck, we’ll even show up if the movie doesn’t come with one of those stereotypical Hollywood endings. When he’s on his game, Woody will convince you it’s a good idea to pay full ticket price for 90 minutes of wordy self-analysis — and you’ll probably even get a few belly laughs out of it. Of course, Woody isn’t always on his game, and as he’s moved into the autumn of his career, he’s often gotten full credit for partial work, especially from critics who remember Annie Hall and Hannah and Her Sisters and are grateful they no longer have to review stuff like Celebrity, …

Exit Music (For a Film): “Lost in Translation”

When I was living in Johannesburg, I spent about four months dating a woman who worked as a professional editor for film and television commercials. She put together a video of surfing clips for me to help me promote “Groundswell,” and while I was thrilled with what she did, I never had a full appreciation of just how much work video editing is until I tried my own hand at the task. As you might have seen three weeks ago, my own project was ridiculously simple. It consisted of a single image, a few simple fades, a sequence of white text scrolling over a black background, and a single splice of video pilfered from the end of a movie to include the final few logos that are standard issue for every credit reel. Getting these few things done kept me up until 4 AM during one evening and 2 AM on another. I think editing is, from the audience’s perspective, the most underrated aspect of filmmaking. A film cannot be great without great editing. Lousy …

Listening Booth: Scarlett Johansson, “Anywhere I Lay My Head”

When it was announced that Scarlett Johansson was going to release an album, there was actually reason to be hopeful. Her sultry, smooth cover of “Summertime,” the first recording of her singing to be released, is actually pretty good. Unfortunately, her new album of Tom Waits covers, Anywhere I Lay My Head, doesn’t fulfill that hope. The depths of Johansson’s lower register are rather impressive. Occasionally she goes so low she can’t reach and her voice drops, but for the most part, Johansson is able to keep up with the deeper notes, which is definitely an asset when covering someone with a voice as gruff and husky as Waits. However, this seems to be the biggest thing she’s able to bring to the table, as she’s frequently outshined by her her collaborator, David Sitek, from TV on the Radio. It’s not that Johansson’s voice is bad — it’s just that she doesn’t know how to use it. Most of Anywhere I Lay My Head finds her singing like Ben Stein: dull and expressionless. The single, …