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Friday Five : |ˈfrīdā – fīv| : On the sixth day of every week, I hit the shuffle button in iTunes and share the first five tracks and thought for each track. Sometimes there is a playlist involved, occasionally we’ll have a guest, but most of the time it’s just me. The rest is up to you, our friends and readers! Fire up the media player of your choice and share the first five random track of your shuffle in the comments.

The Five:

“When the Levee Breaks (alternate U.K. mix)” by Led Zeppelin (from [Led Zeppelin IV] (disc 2) 2014)

This [Led Zeppelin IV] reissue set is worth the price of admission for the stunning guitar and mandolin take of “Going to California” alone. According to Mr. Page, the well is now dry so, perhaps, this will really be the final time the Zeppelin catalog is plundered. It bears noting that John Bonham’s drums on this mix sound positively thunderous (which is saying a lot, as “When the Levee Breaks” already features one of Bonham’s hardest-hitting beats.)

“As Long As I Know I’m Getting Paid” by Patrick Stump (from Truant Wave, 2011)

There was some discussion last week about Live from Daryl’s House; if you are looking for an excellent episode, watch the Patrick Stump episode and be prepared to be entertained. Stump easily floats between the pop-punk of his Fall Out Boy hits and the white-boy soul of Hall’s catalog.

“Dream On” by Aerosmith (from O, Yeah! Ultimate Aerosmith Hits (disc 1), 2002)

Aerosmith is a band that I probably like more in my head than I do in practice. Like any self-respecting teen-aged rock fan, I dug the hell out of the singles from Permanent Vacation and Pump, but I’ll be damned if I could name a single deep cut from either record. Hell, I doubt I could tell you a single, non-single cut from the band.

“Won’t Get Fooled Again” by U2 (from 2000-12-05: Irving Plaza, New York, NY, USA, 2000)

I feel like U2 isn’t exactly known for their amazing covers, listening to this (relatively) pedestrian cover of The Who’s “Won’t Get Fooled Again” kind of enforces that.

“Love Don’t Leave Me Waiting” by Glen Hansard (from Rhythm and Repose, 2012)

Hansard’s well-worn voice is good for the soul. “Love Don’t Leave Me Waiting” is as simple a love song as could be but is effective in its delivery.

What’s on your shuffle today?